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Abu Dhabi, UAEWednesday 21 November 2018

Sharjah-funded hospital for Rohingya refugees opens in Bangladesh

The 100-bedroom hospital in the Kutupalong camp in Cox’s Bazar district has begun taking patients.

A Rohingya refugee and his child in a camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, in August. Campbell MacDiarmid / The National
A Rohingya refugee and his child in a camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, in August. Campbell MacDiarmid / The National

A hospital for Rohingya refugees funded by a Dh3 million donation from Sharjah Media Corporation has opened in Bangladesh.

The 100-bedroom hospital in the Kutupalong camp in Cox’s Bazar district has begun taking patients.

It will serve around 140,000 displaced Rohingyas and is expected to treat 7,200 patients in its first year.

The hospital was built by the Sharjah-based international humanitarian organisation, The Big Heart Foundation, in collaboration with the Medicines Sans Frontieres – Doctors without Borders.

Sheikh Sultan bin Ahmed Al Qasimi, humanitarian envoy of the foundation and chairman of SMC opened the hospital on Friday.

“The Dh3 million funding for the hospital was raised collectively by Sharjah government departments and private institutions, and goes to show the emirate’s and the UAE’s integrated efforts to spreading our humanitarian message worldwide,” said Sheikh Sultan.

“The hospital mirrors the solemn humanitarian bonds that connect the UAE to the rest of the world.”

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Read more:

UAE pledges Dh7.35 million towards Rohingya refugee crisis

UAE charity witnesses first hand Rohingya's 'catastrophic plight'

UAE medical team in Bangladesh to help Rohingya refugees

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The hospital is equipped with intensive care units, paediatric and maternity wards, mobile clinics, and other units including support services for sexual assault victims, and is staffed by a medical team from Doctors without Borders.

The facility also houses a water purification system, that will also serve the area’s residents and is equipped with hi-tech warning systems to detect infectious diseases, and respond to and controls outbreaks.

“The inauguration of the hospital follows a visit we paid earlier this year to Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh where we assessed the refugees’ overwhelming need for healthcare and basic necessities,” said Mariam Al Hammadi, director of the foundation.

“We extend our heartfelt appreciation to SMC for responding to our humanitarian appeal and collaborating with us for this noble cause. By doing so, SMC has set an example of fulfilling a humanitarian commitment we all have towards the world.”