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Abu Dhabi, UAEMonday 25 June 2018

NewsletterArticle

<p>Women drive into Saudi's&nbsp;future, Turkey goes to the polls, and regulating the UAE's social media influencers</p>

Hello from The National’s newsroom in Abu Dhabi.

There were scenes of celebration and jubilation across Saudi Arabia yesterday as a decade-old ban on women drivers was lifted, the most visible of sweeping reforms taking place across the kingdom. Our reporter Naser Al Wasmi was in Jeddah at the turn of midnight and witnessed the first female drivers climb legally behind the wheel of their cars and take to the coastal city's streets. 

Turkey went to the polls yesterday. Initial reports last night suggested the government opposition was on course to win the minimum 10 per cent of the vote needed to take seats in parliament, which could deny incumbent President Recep Tayyip Erdogan a majority. The same results suggested Mr Erdogan may have secured more than half of the vote to retain the presidency, although the results were far from final. Find the latest results here.

Regionally, Palestinians hope British Prince William’s Middle East trip will restore some balance to the Arab-Israeli equation after the US government’s embrace of Israel, writes Ben Lynfield in Jerusalem.

In local news, Omnia Al Saleh looks at the growth in social media-influencers in the UAE, finds out how legislation will affect the business, and discovers the role it all plays in the growing Emirates e-conomy. Meanwhile, in an in-depth package of stories, we look at what the changes in visa rules and the amnesty being offered by the UAE Government means to people who are in the country illegally, such as unwed mothers, people who cannot afford to pay court fines, or families who have overstayed their residency.

Reporting from London, Noor Nanji speaks to the winner of UAE's $1m prize for the World's Best Teacher. Andria Zafirakou warns the arts must not be forgotten in a global push for science.

In our Opinion pages, editor-in-chief Mina Al-Oraibi looks towards next month's Nato summit and says the event is a chance to put multilateralism front and centre, but can it survive in the age of Twitter diplomacy? And Jonathan Cook examines how Palestinians are standing firm in the face of the military might of Israel using little more than kites and scraps of plastic.

Business has an exclusive interview with healthcare entrepreneur BR Shetty. He says his NMC Health company is targeting exponential growth and acquisitions funded by a $2bn war chest. And two-thirds of shoppers in the UAE are happy to buy online, a sign people in the region are gaining trust in e-commerce.

In Arts&Lifestyle, Melissa Gronlund speaks to the producers and performers of Cartography, a play at NYUAD that examines the plight of the world's refugees and aims to break down borders. And Christophe Colin, the new head of menswear at Cos, tells Sarah Maisey why timelessness sits at the heart of this brand.

And in Sport, we have all the latest results, reports and reaction to yesterday's games - including England's dominance over Panama, Japan and Sengal, and Colombia and Poland, plus Rafael Nadal returns world No 1 after Roger Federer was defeated by Borna Coric in the Halle final.

All this and more in The National today – look out for the print edition, visit TheNational.ae, find us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter for round-the-clock updates.

Have a great day,

Nic Ridley
Production editor

 

The National

Hello from The National’s newsroom in Abu Dhabi.

There were scenes of celebration and jubilation across Saudi Arabia yesterday as a decade-old ban on women drivers was lifted, the most visible of sweeping reforms taking place across the kingdom. Our reporter Naser Al Wasmi was in Jeddah at the turn of midnight and witnessed the first female drivers climb legally behind the wheel of their cars and take to the coastal city's streets. 

Turkey went to the polls yesterday. Initial reports last night suggested the government opposition was on course to win the minimum 10 per cent of the vote needed to take seats in parliament, which could deny incumbent President Recep Tayyip Erdogan a majority. The same results suggested Mr Erdogan may have secured more than half of the vote to retain the presidency, although the results were far from final. Find the latest results here.

Regionally, Palestinians hope British Prince William’s Middle East trip will restore some balance to the Arab-Israeli equation after the US government’s embrace of Israel, writes Ben Lynfield in Jerusalem.

In local news, Omnia Al Saleh looks at the growth in social media-influencers in the UAE, finds out how legislation will affect the business, and discovers the role it all plays in the growing Emirates e-conomy. Meanwhile, in an in-depth package of stories, we look at what the changes in visa rules and the amnesty being offered by the UAE Government means to people who are in the country illegally, such as unwed mothers, people who cannot afford to pay court fines, or families who have overstayed their residency.

Reporting from London, Noor Nanji speaks to the winner of UAE's $1m prize for the World's Best Teacher. Andria Zafirakou warns the arts must not be forgotten in a global push for science.

In our Opinion pages, editor-in-chief Mina Al-Oraibi looks towards next month's Nato summit and says the event is a chance to put multilateralism front and centre, but can it survive in the age of Twitter diplomacy? And Jonathan Cook examines how Palestinians are standing firm in the face of the military might of Israel using little more than kites and scraps of plastic.

Business has an exclusive interview with healthcare entrepreneur BR Shetty. He says his NMC Health company is targeting exponential growth and acquisitions funded by a $2bn war chest. And two-thirds of shoppers in the UAE are happy to buy online, a sign people in the region are gaining trust in e-commerce.

In Arts&Lifestyle, Melissa Gronlund speaks to the producers and performers of Cartography, a play at NYUAD that examines the plight of the world's refugees and aims to break down borders. And Christophe Colin, the new head of menswear at Cos, tells Sarah Maisey why timelessness sits at the heart of this brand.

And in Sport, we have all the latest results, reports and reaction to yesterday's games - including England's dominance over Panama, Japan and Sengal, and Colombia and Poland, plus Rafael Nadal returns world No 1 after Roger Federer was defeated by Borna Coric in the Halle final.

All this and more in The National today – look out for the print edition, visit TheNational.ae, find us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter for round-the-clock updates.

Have a great day,

Nic Ridley
Production editor

 

Palestinians see glimmer of hope in Prince William's visit
British royal's itinerary avoids even implicit endorsement of Israeli occupation
Is James Bond's Dh48m Aston Martin DB5 in the Middle East?
The car, stolen in 1997, could be in the region, according to the company tracing it
Etihad pilots offered two-year secondment to Emirates
Move is part UAE airlines' plans to streamline operations
How to manage an overseas property investment
From securing a mortgage to finding a reputable agent and factoring in currency concerns, there are a number of factors to consider
Saudi Arabia's $90 billion boost from women drivers
Economists say that with driving comes independence that will feed into the wider economy
Zsa Zsa, the English bulldog, wins World's Ugliest Dog title 
Dogs in the annual competition flaunt their imperfections
The Big Picture
Devotees wearing costumes made of banana leaves attend a mass as part of a religious ceremony, also known locally as the mud people festival, in Aliaga town, Nueva Ecija province, Philippines. Noel Celis / AFP
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