x

Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 17 August 2018

The National Weekly Newsletter

Welcome to this week's ‘Best of The National’, your guide to our most compelling, important and exclusive content from the past seven days. Here you will find news, features, comment, video and podcasts we believe help in our mission of the "Middle East. Explained”.

This was the week assistant foreign editor Campbell MacDiarmid spent time with the Rohingya in the world's largest refugee camp and Kareem Shaheen in Istanbul spoke to people to discover the true cost of the unfolding financial crisis in Turkey. From Lebanon, we reported on the suspicion that grieving Syrians in exile share about the "official" accounts of their loved-ones' deaths, and we asked: is the besieged town of Idlib the Assad regime's final hurdle?

Closer to home, Abu Dhabi removed the long-standing 20kph buffer on the emirate's roads, a British tourist in Dubai caught speeding 33 times in a rented Lamborghini stumped up Dh125,000 of his Dh175,000 fines and we ventured to the camel-breeding village of Qoa.

 

'I saw them with our women, doing whatever they wanted'. So began one of Campbell MacDiarmid's vivid reports from Bangladesh, where he spent time with the Rohingya Muslims who have fled persecution and violence in neighbouring Myanmar. Reporting from the largest refugee camp in the world, Campbell uncovered personal tales of murder and sexual violence: "You won't find anyone around here who didn't lose at least one family member," said Mohammed Sadiq, a grey-haired farmer in a white skull cap, whose granddaughter and daughter-in-law were both killed. You can read his reports here and here.

At a barbershop on the European side of Istanbul, a week before Eid is usually busy with customers, wrote Kareem Shaheen. Men are anxious to look their best, whether it is a full cut or a beard trim, before heading to their hometowns for the holiday. But not this year. As the lira sank against the US dollar, he found people were curbing their spending and were worried for the future. "Things are not going in a good direction."

Many Syrians in exile have been informed of the deaths of relatives still inside the country. But, despite the death certificates, there are doubts and suspicions over the Assad regime's version of events, reported Sunniva Rose. Staying with Syria, Richard Hall, in a series of dispatches, said the government had begun what was likely to be a slow and difficult march to regain control of the northern province, the last remaining rebel-held area in the country. A link to our video on the future of Idlib is below.

We reported on three days of bloodshed – spurred by several deadly attacks and an ongoing militant offensive – that had shaken the internationally-backed government in Kabul just weeks after an Eid ceasefire offered a glimmer of hope for a resolution to the country’s 17-year conflict.

Ahead of Imran Khan being sworn in as Pakistan’s prime minister today, reporter Ben Farmer examined the challenges he is likely to face in office.

In the UAE, our collective love of cars was rich-pickings: Abu Dhabi removed the 20kph buffer (enjoyed by so many drivers over the years) in a move to make the roads safer, island-wide paid parking comes into effect today, and the British tourist in Dubai who ran up Dh175,000 in a rent Lambo? He's paid a lion's share of his fines.

In our ongoing Neighbour Watch community profiles, Anna Zacharias ventured to Qoa (pronounced like Goa) to find a rare glimpse of Bedouin life in the humble border town famous for the quality of its camel breeding. There are some great pictures too.

DIFC Courts in Dubai appointed liquidators to oversee the winding up of troubled private equity company Abraaj Capital Limited as Dubai Financial Services Authority said it had blocked the firm from initiating new work or moving money to other entities.

And, finally, goodbye Aretha Franklin, your voice filled our hearts and lifted our spirits.

In this week's Business Extra Podcast, assistant business editor Chris Nelson and The National's Andy Scott discuss Elon Musk's increasingly erratic behaviour. The maverick billionaire and chief executive of electric car maker Tesla tweeted last week that he was considering taking his company private - a move that caught the attention of the US Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

Last year Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared: “The era of submissive Turkey, bowing to western demands, is over!” The US and Turkey are Nato allies, but tensions are growing between the two. Turkey now finds itself with a devalued and unstable currency. In Sightline, Tim Marshall asks what’s on Erdogan’s agenda?

It's Hajj season. But what does that mean? Here's everything you need to know about the pilgrimage

And will the battle for Idlib, the rebels' final stronghold, herald the end-game in the Syrian civil war

 

In Opinion, Hussain Sajwani hailed the One Million Arab Coders initiative and its potential to help the youth of today navigate the unpredictable job market of the future.

Faisal al Yafai considered Turkey’s diplomatic spat with the US and the impact this might have on events in Syria.

And Gavin Esler bemoaned the mass disappearance of insects and the unthinkable consequences this could have for the future of humanity.

 

All this and more in The National – visit TheNational.ae, look out for the print edition, find us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter for round-the-clock updates.

And if you're on the go, don't forget our new-and-improved app - available for iOS and Android devices – and get news alerts sent directly to you.

Have a great day

Nic Ridley
Production editor

 

 

ABOUT THIS EMAIL
This newsletter from The National is brought to you by International Media Investments (PO Box 769555, Abu Dhabi, UAE).
Your email address has been recorded because you have previously registered with The National.
Read International Media Investments' Privacy Policy or Terms and Conditions.
Unsubscribe | Update Profile

NewsletterArticle

<p>Qatar risks US wrath, death of the Queen of Soul, and what does the future hold for Pakistan?</p>

Hello from The National's newsroom in Abu Dhabi.

A Qatari pledge to inject $15 billion into the Turkish economy to stave off its collapse is set to deepen divisions with its neighbours and puts Doha in the cross hairs of US retaliation.

Aretha Franklin has died at home in Detroit, aged 76. The American music great enraptured generations and embodied the righteousness and agony of soul music.

In regional news, James Haines-Young unpicks Lebanon’s political dynasties and asks what is their future?

Ben Farmer looks ahead to Imran Khan being sworn in as Pakistan’s prime minister this weekend and examines the challenges he is likely to face in office.

And watch Tim Marshall’s comprehensive take on Turkey’s week of crisis and Naser Al Wasmi’s Hajj explainer. Two million people will travel to Makkah this week.

In UAE news, a British tourist who ran up Dh175,000 in speeding penalties driving a Lamborghini supercar through Dubai has agreed to pay the fine and staying with the roads, we look at how new parking charges will impact the lives of those who live on Abu Dhabi island.

In business, Dubai International Financial Centre Courts have appointed joint provisional liquidators to oversee the winding up of the Dubai-based entity of ailing Abraaj Group, Abraaj Capital Limited.

In arts, Emirati pop-stars Hussain Al Jasmi and Shamma Hamdan lead a host of Arab artists nominated for this year’s BAMA awards, as Saeed Saeed reports and several Dubai cinemas are gearing up to be open 24 hours a day over Eid Al Adha, writes Felicity Campbell.

In lifestyle, Madonna turned 60 this week, Sarah Maisey reviews some of her career highlights and our motoring correspondent reports on the musical star’s Mini Cooper S being put up for sale on a UK website. Selina Denman’s column discusses the case of the Swedish woman who was deported from Dubai earlier this month and Juman Jurallah reports from the home ground of Deportivo Palestino, a Chilean football club known the world over for being the only team outside Palestine to bear its name.

In opinion, Brahma Chellaney writes on Beijing’s South China Sea policy and Shelina Janmohamed discusses space exploration and Islam.

In sport, Richard Jolly assesses All or Nothing, the new Amazon Prime series that documents Manchester City’s record-breaking, title-winning English Premier League winning 2017-18 season. And the desk shares two conflicting views on the Champions League: Andy Mitten says La Liga giants Barcelona have set their sights on Europe’s top trophy this season, while City’s injured star Kevin de Bruyne says Champions League success is not vital for his club to succeed this term.

Nick March
Assistant Editor in Chief

The National

Hello from The National's newsroom in Abu Dhabi.

A Qatari pledge to inject $15 billion into the Turkish economy to stave off its collapse is set to deepen divisions with its neighbours and puts Doha in the cross hairs of US retaliation.

Aretha Franklin has died at home in Detroit, aged 76. The American music great enraptured generations and embodied the righteousness and agony of soul music.

In regional news, James Haines-Young unpicks Lebanon’s political dynasties and asks what is their future?

Ben Farmer looks ahead to Imran Khan being sworn in as Pakistan’s prime minister this weekend and examines the challenges he is likely to face in office.

And watch Tim Marshall’s comprehensive take on Turkey’s week of crisis and Naser Al Wasmi’s Hajj explainer. Two million people will travel to Makkah this week.

In UAE news, a British tourist who ran up Dh175,000 in speeding penalties driving a Lamborghini supercar through Dubai has agreed to pay the fine and staying with the roads, we look at how new parking charges will impact the lives of those who live on Abu Dhabi island.

In business, Dubai International Financial Centre Courts have appointed joint provisional liquidators to oversee the winding up of the Dubai-based entity of ailing Abraaj Group, Abraaj Capital Limited.

In arts, Emirati pop-stars Hussain Al Jasmi and Shamma Hamdan lead a host of Arab artists nominated for this year’s BAMA awards, as Saeed Saeed reports and several Dubai cinemas are gearing up to be open 24 hours a day over Eid Al Adha, writes Felicity Campbell.

In lifestyle, Madonna turned 60 this week, Sarah Maisey reviews some of her career highlights and our motoring correspondent reports on the musical star’s Mini Cooper S being put up for sale on a UK website. Selina Denman’s column discusses the case of the Swedish woman who was deported from Dubai earlier this month and Juman Jurallah reports from the home ground of Deportivo Palestino, a Chilean football club known the world over for being the only team outside Palestine to bear its name.

In opinion, Brahma Chellaney writes on Beijing’s South China Sea policy and Shelina Janmohamed discusses space exploration and Islam.

In sport, Richard Jolly assesses All or Nothing, the new Amazon Prime series that documents Manchester City’s record-breaking, title-winning English Premier League winning 2017-18 season. And the desk shares two conflicting views on the Champions League: Andy Mitten says La Liga giants Barcelona have set their sights on Europe’s top trophy this season, while City’s injured star Kevin de Bruyne says Champions League success is not vital for his club to succeed this term.

Nick March
Assistant Editor in Chief

Qatar's pledge of $15 billion puts Doha on the wrong side of Washington
Qatar risks US wrath with Turkey bailout as Washington vows to tighten the screws on the Erdogan government
The future of Lebanon's political dynasties 
With ageing warlords turned politicians, Lebanon faces its first post-civil war generation of leaders
Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul, dies aged 76
We take a look at the icon's career, which saw her evolve from young gospel singer to modern music's first diva
Chilean Palestinian football club blurs line between sports and politics
The remarkable team formed a century ago by refugees fleeing Ottoman persecution
WATCH: Sightline with Tim Marshall on Erdogan's agenda
Exclusive: Dubai tourist who racked up Dh175,000 in fines in rented Lamborghini finally pays speeding tickets
Farah Hashi ends two-week standoff over Dh1.3 million sports car by handing over Dh117,000 of Dh175,000 penalty
The Big Picture
More than 500,000 dahlias and begonias are placed to make up a 1,800sq metre ‘flower carpet’ at the beginning of a three-day festival in the Grand Place in Brussels, Belgium, yesterday. The first of two carpets was designed around the theme ‘Guanajuato, cultural pride of Mexico’. The second, to be created today, is themed ‘Monuments of Unesco in Flowers’. Yves Herman / Reuters
ABOUT THIS EMAIL
This newsletter from The National is brought to you by International Media Investments (PO Box 769555, Abu Dhabi, UAE).
Your email address has been recorded because you have previously registered with The National.
Read International Media Investments' Privacy Policy or Terms and Conditions.
Unsubscribe | Update Profile