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Abu Dhabi, UAEWednesday 21 November 2018

Ajman club takes joy of sport to disabled

The Ajman Club for the Disabled was founded in 2012 at the request of Sheikh Ammar bin Humaid Al Nuaimi, Crown Prince of Ajman, to offer education and sports facilities to the handicapped.
Saud Rahmatallah, 15, has been a club member for a year. Although he is unable to walk because of  infantile paralysis, he has become an accomplished competition shot-putter. Satish Kumar / The National
Saud Rahmatallah, 15, has been a club member for a year. Although he is unable to walk because of infantile paralysis, he has become an accomplished competition shot-putter. Satish Kumar / The National

AJMAN // A sports club for the handicapped in the emirate has gained 180 members of all ages and nationalities.

The Ajman Club for the Disabled was founded in 2012 at the request of Sheikh Ammar bin Humaid Al Nuaimi, Crown Prince of Ajman, to offer education and sports facilities to the handicapped.

Marwan Al Abdullah, the club’s executive manager, said sports were more essential for disabled people because they eased their isolation from society and improved their physical abilities.

Some members have participated in international championships for the disabled.

The club offers lessons in sports such as table tennis, horse riding, football, bowling and weightlifting.

Mousa Murad, an Emirati human resources student who is partially paralysed, said the club had helped him to improve his fitness.

“I have been bowling at the club for five years, and I’ve gained a good experience and learnt to help others,” said the 31-year-old father of two.

“Through my participations in local championships and camps, I can interact with various players as we learn from each other.”

Saud Rahmatallah, 15, who is unable to walk because of infantile paralysis, has been a club member for a year.

He has become a keen shot-putter and took part in four national and three international championships.

“The international championships opened for me the way to discover the world, make friends and meet people from various cultures,” said Saud.

For Mohammed Al Hosani, a partially-sighted Emirati receptionist at Dubai Municipality, the lectures and workshops he attended at the club had helped him to develop his skill at playing goalball, a game designed with the visually impaired in mind.

“When the club was open in my emirate, I became excited because I found a place near my house where I can take part in sports,” said the 46-year-old, who hopes to become a goalball coach.

“The training sessions are helping me to gain more experience in my game, while the international and local lectures help me to gain information about the rules of goalball.”

roueiti@thenational.ae