Abu Dhabi, UAEWednesday 1 April 2020

Ghosn's dramatic escape increases pressure on foreign suspects

In Japan, authorities are allowed to detain suspects for two 10-day periods for questioning before a decision is made on whether to indict

Three security cameras are seen above of an entrance at the residence of former Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn in Tokyo, Japan. Japanese prosecutors have raided Carlos Ghosn's home in Tokyo after he fled Japan. Getty Images
Three security cameras are seen above of an entrance at the residence of former Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn in Tokyo, Japan. Japanese prosecutors have raided Carlos Ghosn's home in Tokyo after he fled Japan. Getty Images

The Tokyo district court let Carlos Ghosn post bail last March, overruling prosecutors’ objections that he was a flight risk. After all, how could one of the most recognisable foreigners in the country flee while under round-the-clock surveillance?

As the world learned this week, the court was wrong and Mr Ghosn’s stunning escape is bound to bode ill for future foreign suspects seeking to post bail. Yet longer-term, the fallout could carry broader implications for the pace of reforms to a justice system some regard as draconian.

“It’s ironic that Mr Ghosn criticized the Japanese justice system as hostage justice because the prosecutor’s judgment turned out to be right since he actually fled,” said Hiroki Sasakura, a professor at Keio University Law School in Tokyo. “His action might have a reverse effect on the criminal justice system, especially the Japanese court’s way of thinking, which was turning more liberal.”

Given the high-profile nature of the suspect, Japan’s legal system was already under heightened global scrutiny, with critics lambasting prosecutors for detaining the fallen automotive titan so long.

Even after gaining release from prison, the former head of Nissan Motor Company and Renault had restricted access to family members and paid the highest bail fees in Japanese history: 1 billion yen ($9.2 million) for his first bail and then another 500 million yen after he was rearrested on new charges. And the court ordered his three passports — from Brazil, France, and Lebanon — be confiscated.

Japan is unusual for its lengthy pre-trial detentions, strict bail conditions and long delays before suspects are given their day in court, said Luke Nottage, a professor at the University of Sydney Law School and co-director of the Australian Network for Japanese Law.

More Lenience

In response to criticism from defense attorneys, Japanese courts in recent years were more lenient in allowing bail, Keio’s Sasakura said.

A backlash has already begun, with Ichiro Aisawa, a lawmaker from Japan’s ruling Liberal Democratic Party, denouncing the decision to give Mr Ghosn bail in the first place.

“This should have never happened,” Aisawa wrote on Twitter. “We need to establish measures so we don’t screw up ever again.”

In Japan, authorities are allowed to detain suspects for two 10-day periods for questioning before a decision is made on whether to indict. Sometimes suspects are rearrested on new charges as a way to detain them longer.

Prosecutors rarely pursue cases they think they can’t win, and Japan is known for its near-perfect conviction rate.

Those indicted in Japan may apply for bail as they await trial. About 34 per cent of those detained received bail in 2018, according to the Japan Bail Support Association. That’s up from 15 per cent a decade ago.

‘Rigged’ System?

Such statistics reinforce the criticism by Mr Ghosn, who issued a statement on December 31 from Lebanon saying he had fled there to escape what he called Japan’s “rigged” justice system. This may lead to further calls for a more balanced system, according to Yuichi Kaido, a lawyer who has campaigned for changes to Japan’s criminal justice system.

“I think the international community will look at Japan’s criminal justice system with great severity,” Kaido said. “There will be harsh questions raised there about Japan’s criminal justice system, including the death penalty and what is called hostage justice.”

However, the Ghosn case isn’t likely to have a lasting impact on Japan’s attractiveness as an investment destination, according to Deborah Elms, executive director of Asian Trade Centre, a Singapore-based advisory firm.

Foreign companies considering investments in Japan won’t be deterred by the situation surrounding Mr Ghosn, she added, with Asian companies accustomed to unpredictable rules.

“This is just another example of an uncertain legal system that can be worked to your advantage or could come back and bite you,” she said.

Japan should resist internal calls to retaliate by making it even more difficult for suspects to win release from prison ahead of trial, said Nobuo Gohara, a former prosecutor who has been critical of the handling of Ghosn’s case.

“It’s very unfortunate that the efforts of his attorneys to obtain bail and the court’s judgment against the prosecutors to allow it was betrayed,” Mr Gohara wrote in a blog post. “But we shouldn’t simplify the issue to that the court shouldn’t have allowed bail.”

There’s a change that may win widespread support after Mr Ghosn’s escape: a push for more extradition treaties. Japan has only two bilateral agreements, with the US and South Korea. That compares with more than 30 for South Korea and more than 100 for the U.S.

“It’s just one of those areas where they haven’t given much thought and diplomatic attention,” said Mr Nottage, the University of Sydney Law School professor. “The Japanese government might be thinking about maybe we need more extradition treaties.”

Updated: January 3, 2020 01:16 PM

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