Abu Dhabi, UAETuesday 22 October 2019

Tributes paid as long-serving adviser to Sheikh Zayed dies

Abdullah Al Hashemi ran the Ruler's private office as the oil boom led to rapid economic development

Abdullah Al Hashemi speaks with Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, whose father he served for many years. Courtesy: Ministry of Presidential Affairs
Abdullah Al Hashemi speaks with Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, whose father he served for many years. Courtesy: Ministry of Presidential Affairs

Tributes have been paid to a close adviser of Sheikh Zayed who died on Monday at the age of 89.

Abdullah bin Mohammed Al Hashemi ran the Ruler of Abu Dhabi's private office at a time of the discovery of oil and rapid economic development.

He oversaw the founding president's palaces, farms and personnel while supervising the construction projects he funded.

Abdulrahim Al Hashemi, his nephew, said he was a dedicated public servant who "loved Abu Dhabi".

“He dedicated his entire life, from a young man until his last days, in the service of his country," he told The National from the funeral on Monday.

Al Hashemi was raised in an educated family of religious scholars, while his father was a judge.

He first served Sheikh Shakhbut bin Sultan and later Sheikh Zayed, who took over as Ruler of Abu Dhabi in 1966, "whom he loved and regarded as family" his nephew said.

“It wasn’t a relationship between a ruler and his subjects, but that of kin.

"He rarely travelled because he couldn’t bear to be away from Abu Dhabi."

In 2011, Al Hashemi was a recipient of the Abu Dhabi Award, one of the highest civic honours.

In their note, judges noted that he also oversaw projects involving Hajj and Umrah and financial and administration in early government.

"Throughout his lifetime of loyal and dedicated service, Abdullah worked silently with honesty, sincerity, determination, commitment and initiative," they wrote.

He is survived by six sons and four daughters.

Updated: September 23, 2019 06:41 PM

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