x Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 21 July 2017

Tailgating fatalities on the rise

There was a 40 per cent increase in the number of deaths resulting from tailgating last year, from 2012.

Close-moving traffic on Sheikh Zayed Road close to Jumeirah Lake Towers in Dubai.  Jeffrey E Biteng / The National
Close-moving traffic on Sheikh Zayed Road close to Jumeirah Lake Towers in Dubai. Jeffrey E Biteng / The National

DUBAI // There was a 40 per cent increase in the number of deaths resulting from tailgating last year, from 2012.

And in the first quarter of this year, seven people were killed on the emirate’s roads for the same reason, Dubai Police said.

“Seven is a significant number considering that 22 people were killed in such accidents in the whole of 2013,” said Col Jamal Al Bannai, deputy director of Bur Dubai Police.

There were 13 deaths recorded in 2012.

Police launched a two-month campaign on Wednesday to raise awareness on the dangers of not keeping a safe distance between cars.

“Although the campaign is technically for two months, this is something that we will continue to focus on,” said Col Al Bannai, who reiterated that tailgaiting could lead to serious injury or death.

“Motorists should be able to measure how much distance is needed between vehicles depending on the traffic flow.

“The distance should leave you with enough braking distance in case there is an accident.”

According to gov.co.uk, the offical site of UK Government services, drivers should “allow at least a two-second gap between you and the vehicle in front on roads carrying faster-moving traffic and in tunnels where visibility is reduced. The gap should be at least doubled on wet roads.”

Those driving a large vehicle through a tunnel should allow for a four-second gap between it and the vehicle in front, and motorcycles also need a greater distance to stop.

Drivers who break the law will be fined Dh400 and receive four black points, Col Al Bannai said.

dmoukhallati@thenational.ae