Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 15 August 2020

Watch: the world's tallest swing has opened to thrill-seekers in China

The 108-metre-high swing towers over the edge of a cliff in Chongqing and reaches speeds of up to 130 kilometres per hour

Thrill-seekers, take note: the world's tallest swing has opened in China.

Perched on top of a 700-metre cliff in Chongqing, in the country's south-west, the 108-metre-tall rainbow swing flings people out over the edge at speeds of up to 130 kilometres per hour.

The world's largest swing has opened in Chongqing, south-west China. Courtesy iChongqing
The world's largest swing has opened in Chongqing in south-west China. Courtesy iChongqing

Recognised by Guinness World Records as the tallest swing frame in the world, China's new attraction is not for the faint-hearted.

The giant structure at the Yunyang Longgang Scenic Spot features a 100 metre-tall archway and an even taller launching tower.

Those brave enough to try it are strapped into a safety harness before swinging out over the cliff's edge, where they can reach heights of up to 80 metres.

The swing was originally supposed to open earlier this year, but the coronavirus pandemic delayed plans. Before its official opening last week, the swing was rigorously tested by engineers who claim it can withstand wind speeds of up to 165kph and even survive an earthquake, Chinese state media said.

The record-breaking swing is 12 metres taller than the previous title holder, the Big Rush Swing in South Africa.

However, it's not the first extreme attraction in Chongqing. A few hours away from the giant swing is Wansheng Ordovician Theme Park.

Wansheng Ordovician Theme Park in Chongqing, China.
Wansheng Ordovician Theme Park in Chongqing, China.

Another draw for thrill-seekers, this park is home to the world’s longest glass footbridge, which hangs 120 metres above ground over the edge of a mountain.

There's also a mind-the-gap bridge where people wear a harness and try to cross huge gaps between rungs in the horizontal ladder, suspended 152 metres above ground.

Updated: July 29, 2020 09:31 AM

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