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Abu Dhabi, UAESunday 16 December 2018

Trump tweets about women's marches as protesters gather

The US President said it was the "perfect day" for women to march

People participate in the Second Annual Women's March in Washington DC. Aaron Bernstein/ Reuters
People participate in the Second Annual Women's March in Washington DC. Aaron Bernstein/ Reuters

President Donald Trump tweeted that it was a "perfect day" for women to march to celebrate the "economic success and wealth creation" that's happened during his first year in office — while women across the nation rallied against him and his policies.

"Get out there now to celebrate the historic milestones and unprecedented economic success and wealth creation that has taken place over the last 12 months," the Republican wrote Saturday afternoon. "Lowest female unemployment in 18 years!"

But people participating in rallies and marches in the US and around the world Saturday denounced Trump's views on immigration, abortion, LGBT rights, women's rights and more.

The march in Washington, DC, on Saturday had the feel of a political rally when US Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and US Representative Nancy Pelosi, both Democrats, urged women to run for office and vote to oppose Trump and the Republicans' agenda.

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"We march, we run, we vote, we win," Ms Pelosi said, to applause.

Thousands of people turned out for the rally at Lincoln Memorial and a march from the National Mall to Lafayette Park. It was one of many around the US and the world in support of female empowerment.

Thousands of people gathered in Cleveland; Richmond, Virginia; Philadelphia; New York; Austin, Texas; and elsewhere.

"I think right now with the #MeToo movement, it's even more important to stand for our rights," said Karen Tordivo, who marched in Cleveland with her husband and 6-year-old daughter.

In Palm Beach, Florida, home to Mr Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate, several hundred people gathered carrying anti-Trump signs as they prepared to march as part of Saturday's planned protests.

Across the globe, people hit the streets on the anniversary of Mr Trump's inauguration, marching against his policies and in support of the #MeToo movement against sexual assault and harassment.

In Palm Beach, a group of women wearing red cloaks and white hats like the characters in the book and TV show "The Handmaid's Tale" marched in formation, their heads bowed.

In Los Angeles, organisers predicted thousands of people, including state officials and celebrities, would march to City Hall.

Organisers in New York said the march was important because basic rights for women, immigrants and others are under attack.

American women's rights attorney Gloria Allred speaks at Rally Park City to celebrate community victories, honoring the one-year anniversary of the Women's March and Park City's March on Main in Utah. Angela Weiss/ AFP Photo
American women's rights attorney Gloria Allred speaks at Rally Park City to celebrate community victories, honoring the one-year anniversary of the Women's March and Park City's March on Main in Utah. Angela Weiss/ AFP Photo

Cathy Muldoon, a high school librarian from Dallas, Pennsylvania, took her two teenage daughters to the New York rally and said marching gives people hope. She said this year's action is set against the backdrop of the Trump presidency, which "turned out to be as scary as we thought it would be."

"I've not seen any checks and balances," she said. "Everything is moving toward the right, and we have a president who seems to have no decency."

In Chicago, thousands of people gathered in Grant Park. Fawzia Mirza drew cheers from the crowd as she kicked off the event with a reference to the partial government shutdown, which began hours earlier.

"When the government shuts down, women still march," she said.

She said the event was about channelling women's energy and "putting that power in the polls."

Earlier on Saturday, dozens of activists gathered in Rome to denounce violence against women and express support for the #MeToo movement. They were joined by Italian actress and director Asia Argento, who made headlines after alleging in 2017 she had been sexually assaulted by Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein in the 1990s.

The 2017 rally in Washington, DC, and hundreds of similar marches created solidarity for those denouncing Trump's views on abortion, immigration, LGBT rights and more. Millions of people around the world marched during last year's rallies, and many on Saturday thought about all that's happened in the past year.

The Republican president on Friday delivered new support to the anti-abortion movement he once opposed, speaking by video to thousands of activists at the annual March for Life.

In New York, scheduled speakers included Ashley Bennett, a Democrat who was elected Atlantic County, New Jersey, freeholder last November. Bennett defeated Republican incumbent John Carman, who had mocked the 2017 women's march in Washington with a Facebook post asking whether the women would be home in time to cook dinner.

Among the goals of this year's march are getting more Democrats to run for public office and bolstering voter registration.