Abu Dhabi, UAEThursday 20 February 2020

Giuliani subpoenaed by the House for Trump’s impeachment inquiry

US president has tweeted about inquiry at least 180 times since it was announced last Tuesday

Former New York City mayor and president's attorney Rudy Giuliani has been subpoenaed in the impeachment investigation against Donald Trump. AFP / Eduardo Munoz Alvarez
Former New York City mayor and president's attorney Rudy Giuliani has been subpoenaed in the impeachment investigation against Donald Trump. AFP / Eduardo Munoz Alvarez

Three House committees subpoenaed Donald Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, on Monday over his role in the Ukraine-related impeachment investigation.

The chairs of the foreign affairs, oversight and intelligence committees demanded that Mr Giuliani hand over text messages, phone records and other communications since January 2017 when the Mr Trump took office.

They gave the former mayor of New York an October 15 deadline to hand over the documents. If he fails to meet the deadline, he could be held in contempt of court.

“You stated more recently that you are in possession of evidence in the form of text messages, phone records, and other communications, indicating that you were not acting alone and that other Trump administration officials may have been involved in this scheme,” the three chairs said in a letter.

They also subpoenaed US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Friday. Mr Pompeo met Mr Trump at the White House on Monday.

He was in on the July 25 call between the president and Ukrainian leader Volodymyr Zelenskiy, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Five of Mr Pompeo's aides were also subpoenaed.

Mr Trump is trying to find out the identity of the whistle-blower whose information led to the inquiry.

“We’re trying to find out about a whistle-blower," Mr Trump said on Monday. "We have a whistle-blower that reports things that were incorrect."

But the whistleblower’s lawyer, Andrew Bakaj, said his client was "entitled to anonymity” and was “fearing for his life”.

Earlier in the day, Mr Trump attacked the chairman of the House intelligence committee, Adam Schiff, and suggested he should be arrested for treason.

“Adam Schiff illegally made up a fake and terrible statement, pretended it to be mine as the most important part of my call to the Ukrainian President, and read it aloud to Congress and the American people," he tweeted.

"It bore no relationship to what I said on the call. Arrest for treason?”

Mr Trump has tweeted about the impeachment inquiry at least 180 times since it was announced last Tuesday.

It was announced by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi after the whistle-blower revealed that Mr Trump withheld aid and asked Mr Zelenskiy to investigate his political opponent Joe Biden and his son Hunter.

Meanwhile, The New York Times reported on Tuesday that Mr Trump urged Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in a recent call to help US Attorney General William Barr in an investigation of special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe.

The report said the White House had restricted access to the call's transcript to a small group of the president's aides.

Like the call with Mr Zelenskiy, Mr Trump's call with Mr Morrison appears to be another instance where he has used his high position to advance his personal political interests.

Updated: October 1, 2019 02:50 AM

SHARE

SHARE

Most Popular