x Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 22 July 2017

US responsible for chaos in Somalia

Jordan's pro-government Ad Dustour daily ran a lead editorial saying piracy was the "bitter fruit" of foreign interference in Somalia, which ended with the collapse of the state following the withdrawal of the invading American troops in 1993.

Jordan's pro-government Ad Dustour daily ran a lead editorial saying piracy was the "bitter fruit" of foreign interference in Somalia, which ended with the collapse of the state following the withdrawal of the invading American troops in 1993. "Therefore, Washington and its allies, which occupied Somalia and detonated civil wars in the Horn of Africa under the banner of 'creative chaos', are the ones responsible for the loss of Somalia and the emergence of the piracy phenomenon."

Those powers seem to be moving the warlords and pirates "by remote control," the paper wrote, while the Arab states are not sharing in finding a solution, even though many Red Sea states are Arab states. "Eliminating the piracy phenomenon is linked to the return of calm and stability to Somalia, which is - in our opinion - the responsibility of the major states and especially that of Washington."

"Our democracy in Kuwait is at once extremely ludicrous and ill-fated," wrote Hussein al Rawi, a regular columnist for Kuwaiti independent newspaper Al Rai al Aam. "Democracy, through the Kuwaiti constitution, guarantees that any Kuwaiti MP has the right to question the Prime Minister because of his inability to handle things, but we never see this happening because 'questioning the Prime Minister is a Red Line'!" This is clear proof that some Kuwaiti MPs do not understand democracy, he wrote. Some MPs started attacking colleagues who presented the request for questioning as if they had committed a sin.

"My brothers in the parliament, if you want a democracy according to your own tastes filled with red lines and such, then you will only be helping make the country worse and more lost," al Rawi wrote. "But if you want a real democracy, especially as you entered the parliament thanks to democracy, then you have to observe the correct rules of this democracy and the Kuwaiti constitution will guarantee your rights."

"What are the Kurds of Iraq thinking? Why are they embarking on dubious and suspicious steps?" the UAE's independent newspaper Al Khaleej wrote in an editorial. "A few days ago, it was revealed that they received light Bulgarian weapons without the consent or knowledge of the central government. They are also signing oil contracts with foreign companies outside the framework of the general oil policy pertaining to contracts."

They also refuse to have the Iraqi Army present in the Kurdistan region. The paper said Israeli companies and Mossad networks are working in Kurdistan. "Achieving Kurdish aspirations should not clash with Iraq's unity or provoke regional fears of the expansion of these aspirations, which would threaten the concerned states (Turkey, Iran, and Syria), which would not stand with their arms folded, thus exposing the Kurds to further catastrophes and disasters," Al-Khaleej wrote. "The Kurds should be rational and should not bet on foreign powers."

Elie Shalhoub, a regular columnist for Lebanon's independent pro-opposition newspaper Al Akhbar, wrote that the expected ratification of the US-Iraqi security agreement will surpass, in historical importance and repercussions, the occupation and invasion. The debate over this "humiliating treaty" recalls that of five years ago over whether to resist the occupation or work with it, he wrote. Five years on, most resistance forces have swung in favour of the Americans. "Those who used to call for resistance, including most of the Arab Sunnis, entered the political process after most of their problems were solved," Shalhoub wrote. Only the Muslim Scholars' Association remained outside the flock.

"The most laughable part of this charade is the bazaar that was opened a while ago under the title of securing the ratification of the treaty by satisfying some minor demands of the Kurds and some Arab Sunni coalitions," he wrote. "History's verdict will be severe this time around: all those who raise their hands in favour of the treaty today in the Iraqi parliament are traitors." * Digest complied from www.mideastwire.com