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Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 15 December 2018

Lorde considers cancelling Tel Aviv concert over Jerusalem recognition

The letter was sent after Donald Trump’s move on the Israeli capital, which sparked protests across the Middle East

Pop star Lorde is considering cancelling a planned concert in Israel after fans of the New Zealand singer sent her an open letter asking her not to fulfil her commitment to play in Tel Aviv. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
Pop star Lorde is considering cancelling a planned concert in Israel after fans of the New Zealand singer sent her an open letter asking her not to fulfil her commitment to play in Tel Aviv. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Pop star Lorde is considering cancelling a planned concert in Israel after fans of the New Zealand singer sent her an open letter asking her not to fulfil her commitment to play in Tel Aviv.

The letter reads: “We're two young women, one Jewish, one Palestinian... we feel strongly about this” and the pair say that the gig would show support for Israel’s occupation of Palestine.

Justine Sachs, who is Jewish, and Palestinian Nadia Abu-Shanab told the singer that: “A performance in Israel sends the wrong message. Playing in Tel Aviv will be seen as giving support to the policies of the Israeli government, even if you make no comment on the political situation.”

The letter was sent after American president Donald Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, which sparked protests across the Middle East and beyond.

The UN general assembly voted to denounce Donald Trump’s move on Thursday.

Lorde responded on Twitter to her fans, saying: “Noted! Been speaking w many people about this and considering all options. Thank u for educating me i am learning all the time too 🌸”

If she pulled out, it would follow a recent tradition of shows being cancelled due to the situation in Israel. Elvis Costello pulled out of two gigs in 2010 over the treatment of Palestinians.

He said: “There are occasions when merely having your name added to a concert schedule may be interpreted as a political act that resonates more than anything that might be sung and it may be assumed that one has no mind for the suffering of the innocent.”