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Abu Dhabi, UAEMonday 23 July 2018

Beyond the Headlines Podcast: Lebanon's first elections in nearly a decade will have regional ramifications

In this episode, The National’s Foreign Editor, Arthur MacMillan, dissects the results and breaks down what the new parliament makeup will mean for the region

Supporters of a civil society movement rally against the Lebanese election results in front of the Ministry of Interior in Beirut. Anwar Amro / AFP Photo
Supporters of a civil society movement rally against the Lebanese election results in front of the Ministry of Interior in Beirut. Anwar Amro / AFP Photo

For the first time since 2009, Lebanon voted to elect 128 members to parliament.

Saad Hariri, the current Prime Minister of Lebanon and his Sunni-dominated party fared better than expected. But he lost seats to Hezbollah, the Shiite-movement that now has more seats and pull in the parliament than ever before.

As in almost any election in the Arab World, this one was marred in controversy. Voter turnout was low with less than half of the population taking to the ballots.

Those who did vote accused the system of voter fraud. The Lebanese Association for Democratic Elections reported over 7,000 polling violations, fights broke out in the streets, and at least three candidates accused other parties of intimidation.

All said, the results will have regional ramifications.

In this episode, The National’s Foreign Editor, Arthur MacMillan, dissects the results and breaks down what the new parliament makeup will mean for the region.