Abu Dhabi, UAEMonday 13 July 2020

In Iraq, women fight to keep rights on campaign trail

Female candidates are pushing violence against women, discrimination at the workplace and poor school attendance as issues in the April 30 election.
A campaign banner shows the parliamentary candidate Sabah abed Al Rasul Al Tamimi in Baghdad. With fears that women’s rights are being eroded in Iraq, prospective female lawmakers are determined to push women’s issues to the fore of campaigning for this month’s elections. Ahmad Al Rubaye / AFP / April 15, 2014
A campaign banner shows the parliamentary candidate Sabah abed Al Rasul Al Tamimi in Baghdad. With fears that women’s rights are being eroded in Iraq, prospective female lawmakers are determined to push women’s issues to the fore of campaigning for this month’s elections. Ahmad Al Rubaye / AFP / April 15, 2014

BAGHDAD // With fears that women’s rights are being eroded in Iraq, prospective female politicians are determined to push women’s issues to the fore of campaigning for this month’s elections.

Despite a constitutional requirement that a quarter of all MPs be women, Iraq lags on key indicators such as female employment and literacy, and there is a bill before parliament that opponents say dramatically curtails women’s rights.

Also at issue ahead of April 30 elections are high levels of violence against women, discrimination at the workplace and poor school attendance.

“I did not expect that we will fight for women’s rights in this country,” said Inam Abdul Majed, a television news presenter and an election hopeful running in Baghdad.

“I wanted to fight for better education, better services, better life conditions ... But we are in this big trouble now, and it is a primary problem to be solved.”

Decades ago, Iraq was seen as the most progressive country in the Middle East for women, but now-executed dictator Saddam Hussein rolled back many of those advances in the 1990s, and the rampant bloodshed that followed his ousting in 2003 has led to further restrictions.

Now, more than a quarter of women older than 12 are illiterate and only 85 girls attend secondary school for every 100 boys, according to a May 2013 UN report.

Among the most troubling indicators is the fact that only 14 per cent of Iraqi women are either working or actively seeking employment.

“It’s a serious issue, because it affects women’s financial independence and, without financial independence, women have very few choices in their lives,” said Frances Guy, the Iraq representative for UN Women, the world body’s gender equality watchdog.

According to analysts and would-be lawmakers, the near-daily violence that plagues much of Iraq is largely to blame, but other important factors such as domestic abuse, workplace discrimination and problems with the education system are also crucial.

More than half of women between 15-49 believe that a husband has the right to hit his wife in certain instances, but violence against women also occurs at markets, on the street and while using transportation.

Key to changing the situation, UN Women says, is altering male perceptions in a country where nearly half believe they are justified in preventing their wives from working, and around half say they have a right to beat their wives in some circumstances.

Potentially making matters worse is a bill before parliament that regulates personal status among Iraq’s majority Shiite community, which critics say would mark a dramatic step backward for women’s rights.

The potential law – which analysts have dismissed as politicking ahead of elections – would allow girls to marry before the age of nine and require a wife to have sex with her husband whenever he demands it, along with a litany of other restrictions.

In an effort to ensure that women receive a guaranteed level of representation in parliament, Iraq’s constitution requires that a quarter of all lawmakers be female.

No such requirement is enforced on the government, however, and all of Iraq’s 31 cabinet-level positions are held by men, with the sole exception of the minister of state for women’s affairs.

The number of women cabinet members has declined from previous governments, according to Intisar Al Juburi, a female lawmaker from the northern province of Nineveh.

“If we look at election programmes put forward by the parties and political blocs, we see that they have focused on women’s rights,” she said.

“But when male MPs win a seat in the election, they forget about women or their programme for women.”

At a recent forum debating women’s issues ahead of the election, hosted by the outgoing MP Safia Al Suhail, several speakers criticised the performance of female legislators and suggested that the parliamentary quota is having a negative effect by pushing unqualified politicians into positions of power.

Most, however, noted that it remained necessary in what is a male-dominated society.

“Although the quota has many negative sides to it ... it is more positive than negative,” said Maysoon Al Damaluji, an MP from Baghdad who is campaigning for re-election.

“At least it has introduced women to political life, and made them a reality within the political life.”

* Agence France-Presse

Updated: April 20, 2014 04:00 AM

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