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Abu Dhabi, UAETuesday 25 September 2018

Doha backs terrorism under pretext of 'non-existent' democracy, says AFHR

The Arab Federation for Human Rights said there was growing concern over Qatar's role in supporting the Muslim Brotherhood

Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and Egypt cut all ties with Doha last June over its support of extremism and interference in other countries’ affairs. EPA
Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and Egypt cut all ties with Doha last June over its support of extremism and interference in other countries’ affairs. EPA

The Arab Federation for Human Rights (AFHR) has denounced Doha's support of terrorism, accusing it of using democracy that does not exist in Qatar as a justification for the support.

The allegation was made during a symposium organised by AFHR to press the international community to work towards ending Iran’s interference in the region and to pressure the Qatari government to stop its suppression of the opposition. It also demanded that more consideration be shown to human rights issues in Qatar, state news agency WAM reported.

"The deterioration in freedom, stripping of citizenship and forced deportation exercised by the Qatar government, as well as Doha's support to extremism and terrorism, destabilisation and the use of funds and media as means of support to terrorist groups, are all done in the name of democracy. Ironically, there is no democracy in Qatar," said Sarhan Saadi, AFHR's general coordinator.

"Human rights organisations are increasingly alarmed at Qatar’s role in supporting the Muslim Brotherhood terrorist group. It has been proved that this terrorist group received finance, arms and ideological support from individuals and group that are closely linked to Qatar," he added.

Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and Egypt cut all ties with Doha last June over its support of extremism and interference in other countries’ affairs.

Last week, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Dr Anwar Gargash said that Qatar's inability to provide evidence that it does not support terrorist groups and activities has led to it creating a string of “weak” excuses.

Dr Gargash, who has been one of Qatar's strongest critics since the crisis broke out on June 5, said that the only way the issue will be resolved is if Qatar changes its “policies of supporting extremism, terrorism, and of interfering in the domestic affairs of others”.

Earlier this week, the UAE lodged a complaint with the United Nations against Qatar after its jets intercepted two Emirati civilian aircraft, in the latest escalation of tensions between the two countries.

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