x Abu Dhabi, UAEWednesday 26 July 2017

Greek editor stands trial over Swiss accounts list

A prominent Greek journalist who published the names of more than 2,000 wealthy Greeks with Swiss bank accounts appeared in court yesterday to stand trial on charges of violating data privacy laws.

ATHENS // A prominent Greek journalist who published the names of more than 2,000 wealthy Greeks with Swiss bank accounts appeared in court yesterday to stand trial on charges of violating data privacy laws.

Costas Vaxevanis, editor of the Hot Doc weekly magazine, was arrested at the weekend for publishing the "Lagarde List" which French authorities gave to Athens in 2010 so that the account holders could be investigated for possible tax evasion.

The list, and the accompanying saga of how it was passed from one senior official to the next and misplaced at one point without anyone apparently taking action, has riveted Greeks who are angry at a political class seen as unwilling to crack down on the wealthy elite.

Vaxevanis's trial was adjourned soon after starting until Thursday. He could face up to two years in prison if convicted.

"I was doing my job in the name of the public interest," Vaxevanis told a crowd of supporters outside court. "Journalism is revealing the truth when everyone else is trying to hide it."

The list of 2,059 Greek account holders at HSBC in Switzerland features dozens of prominent business figures including a handful of shipping tycoons, companies and two politicians. It also includes a painter, an actress and many listed as architects, doctors, lawyers and housewives.

The centre-left Ta Nea newspaper reprinted the list yesterday, devoting 10 pages to the accounts which were said to hold about €2 billion (Dh9.48bn) until 2007. However, the daily said it was not leaping to any conclusions about the list's "content nor the connotations it evokes in a large part of the public".

It did not say why it had decided to reprint the list and stressed there was no evidence linking anyone on the list to tax evasion.

"Ta Nea is publishing the list today. Will they be prosecuted?" Vaxevanis wrote on his Twitter account. "Today, it's not Hot Doc that's on trial but press freedom in Greece, and truth."

Vaxevanis criticised Greek media - which apart from Ta Nea have avoided any mention of those on the list - for failing to cover his magazine's revelations extensively.

The list has been named after Christine Lagarde, the head of the International Monetary Fund who was the French finance minister when it was handed over.

Hot Doc said the list was sent to it anonymously and authorities have not confirmed its authenticity.