x Abu Dhabi, UAEThursday 27 July 2017

British politicians launch campaign against Scottish independence

'Better Together' campaign insists Scotland benefits from Britain's 'unique' influence.

From left, Scottish Labour Party Leader Johann Lamont, former British Finance Minister Alistair Darling, Scottish Conservative Party Leader Ruth Davidson and Scottish Liberal Democrat Leader Willie Rennie, support the 'Better Together' campaign against Scottish independence.
From left, Scottish Labour Party Leader Johann Lamont, former British Finance Minister Alistair Darling, Scottish Conservative Party Leader Ruth Davidson and Scottish Liberal Democrat Leader Willie Rennie, support the 'Better Together' campaign against Scottish independence.

EDINBURGH // British lawmakers from across the political spectrum launched a campaign against Scottish independence yesterday, insisting that Scotland benefits from Britain's "unique influence".

Alex Salmond, Scotland's First Minister and leader of the pro-independence Scottish National Party (SNP), plans to hold a referendum in autumn 2014 on severing the more than 300-year-old union and launched its campaign last month.

But as the "Better Together" campaign launched in Edinburgh, British Prime Minister David Cameron said that a united Britain was "something worth fighting for".

"We all know Scotland can stand on its own two feet," said Mr Cameron, whose Conservative party backs the union along with its junior coalition partners the Liberal Democrats and the opposition Labour party.

"We just believe the UK is special and we would all lose if separation happened. We treasure our United Kingdom and Scotland's place in our family of nations," he added.

Pro-union campaign leader Alistair Darling said Scotland currently enjoyed "the best of both worlds" through the devolved powers of its parliament at Holyrood and its role in British government.

"The United Kingdom is a country with unique influence -in the EU, in the Commonwealth and in the G20 group of the world's largest economies," the former finance minister said as he launched the campaign in the Scottish capital.

"Why would we want to give away this deep influence?"

Speaking at Edinburgh's Napier University, Mr Darling said that Scotland has "real clout" in the UN Security Council, the European Union, the International Monetary Fund and Nato as part of Britain.

Mr Darling, the Labour member of parliament for Edinburgh South West who was Chancellor of the Exchequer from 2007 to 2010, said the decision would be "the most important we will make in our lifetime".

He added that independence would be an "inadequate response" to Britain's economic problems.

"Times are really tough at home and really uncertain, especially in Europe, where all the problems of a currency union are laid bare," he said.