x Abu Dhabi, UAEMonday 24 July 2017

US-Israeli ties are no longer an unbreakable impasse

A growing number of nations no longer see Israel and the US as genuine peace brokers but, rather, as a real impediment to peace in the Middle East.

Palestinian women walk past a Brazilian flag hanging on a vendor's cart in the centre of the West Bank city of Ramallah a day after Argentina and Uruguay said they were joining Brazil in recognising an independent Palestinian state.
Palestinian women walk past a Brazilian flag hanging on a vendor's cart in the centre of the West Bank city of Ramallah a day after Argentina and Uruguay said they were joining Brazil in recognising an independent Palestinian state.

I refer to the front page news article Latin American countries recognise Palestinian state (December 8). The fact that American and Israeli politicians now talk about peace negotiations after more countries recognise Palestine can mean only one thing: that the forging of US-Israel ties is no longer an unbreakable impasse to the founding of a internationally recognised state of Palestine.

Fortunately, a growing number of nations no longer see Israel and the US as genuine peace brokers but, rather, as a real impediment to peace in the Middle East.

Rayed Darwish, Abu Dhabi

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Abba Eban, the late Israeli foreign minister, once said: "The Palestinians never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity." It rang true at the time. But never has this saying been more untrue than these days for its inability to capture the genuine complexity of the issue.

From the beginning, the international community was clear in its approach, realising that pacifying the conflict would take a long time. Hence there was an immediate need for the United Nations Relief and Works Agency to ease the suffering of Palestinian refugees.

Israel, after making sure that powerful states were on board, realised that stealing a country was not easy. People will go through stages of grief. They will be angry, defiant, rebellious, sad, in despair, beaten and worn out. Eventually, they will come to grips with the catastrophe and become more willing to compromise on everything.

The Palestinians went wrong on many pivotal stages in their struggle. Not because they did not seize opportunities but because they were fighting with themselves and their demons. Israel had a plan; Arab countries and the international community did too. It was only the Palestinians who failed to see that were involved in a fight amongst themselves. They surely lacked visionary leadership and an understanding of world politics.

Ziad Aoudi, Dubai

 

Savvy diplomacy at the GCC summit

As reported in the front page news article Sheikh Abdullah calls for end to Iran stand-off (December 8), the foreign minister's statement was a balanced and tactful reply. Well done, GCC. They were able to show support for Iran's rights as a sovereign nation and demonstrate Middle East solidarity without condoning secrecy or letting the UAE island dispute colour their overall position.

Lots of political savvy there.

Craig Young, Dubai

 

The UK moved fast on bank pay

I refer to Rupert Wright's opinion article Fat cat bankers still happy to take the money and run (December 3). British Bankers' Association here, Mr Wright - proving we do use the internet now and again. You are absolutely right that anytime we come to work with a sunny outlook a quick look at our Google alerts soon dispels it. Bankers' bonuses are indeed a hot-button issue around the world.

But we were talking about public policy responses, comparing the approach of the UK's government and regulators with those of other countries. In the UK, the authorities have done more - and moved faster - to intervene in the pay policies of banks. We believe this has not been seen in many other countries where the public criticism is just as outspoken.

Brian Mairs, UK

 

Reform is needed to lure investors back

I refer to IPOs suffer as market volumes in UAE plunge (December 8). I don't understand why is this a surprise. The legal system, the cold showers undergone by investors, the property market's lack of transparency - these things keep adding up to scare investors away.

There is a serious need for the authorities to deal with investor mistrust in order to get the economy back on track. Enough time was lost hoping that people would come back. Every country in the world is fighting for the same available cash and only the countries with good and transparent rules will win.

Salvatore Primo, Dubai

 

Questions about workers' deaths

I refer to Two held in deaths of cradle workers (December 7). The deaths of two window cleaners in Dubai was unimaginably gruesome. Will the families of the deceased be adequately taken care of by the builder or contractor?

Amit Bhattacharjie, Dubai

 

Auto show lacks many big names

I went to the Abu Dhabi International Motor Show, dutifully paid my Dh20 entry fee and was surprised not to find Mercedes, BMW, Audi, Lamborghini, Nissan, Honda, Porsche, Fiat, Bentley, Rolls Royce, Bugatti, Citroen, Renault, Seat, Chrysler, Dodge, Volvo, Saab nor Tata. Not much of an International Motor Show.

Mohammed Kanoo, Dubai