x Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 22 July 2017

Two views of the recent fatwa against terrorism

It's a good thing that Dr Tahir ul Qadri compares al Qa'eda to the Khawarij of the past in his opinion article My fatwa against the terrorists' creed (March 6).

A reader applauds the idea to turn the historic Bastakiya district in Dubai into a more vibrant community by offering housing to low-income Emirati families.
A reader applauds the idea to turn the historic Bastakiya district in Dubai into a more vibrant community by offering housing to low-income Emirati families.

It's a good thing that Dr Tahir ul Qadri compares al Qa'eda to the Khawarij of the past in his opinion article My fatwa against the terrorists' creed (March 6). But in the case of the Khawarij, who waged a war of hostility with their swords against anyone disagreeing with them, including those in their midst, they ended up self-destructing because they killed each other in the end. By contrast, groups like al Qa'eda seem only to grow and multiply in number. So far, it does not seem as if they will implode on themselves the way the Khawarij did in the past. But I thank Dr ul Qadri for the courageous fatwa. Maggie O'Neele, Abu Dhabi

Yes, violence should be rejected everywhere and by every Muslim, but I'm afraid Dr Tahir ul Qadri has taken one side only. I would have loved to see him condemn the acts of terrorism from the other side too as suicide bombing seems to be the only weapon for misled groups in their fight for freedom. We're talking about the occupation of Muslim countries and I would have liked to see some condemnation there. It seems that Dr Qadri is interested only in incriminating Muslims involved in violence, which is something the whole world has been doing for years. Who is to incriminate Jewish and Christian violence? All acts of violence should be condemned, religious or not. Ziad Sartawi, Dubai

With reference to Sultan Al Qassemi's opinion article Breathing life into Bastakiya and the history of Dubai (March 7), the idea of housing low-income Emiratis in the area would be a magnificent first step in injecting the area with an authentic shot of culture. I think with the suitable encouragement and outlets (such as the idea of after-school educational centres), those new residents will help soften the artificial feel that can accompany these types of projects. Bastakiya as it is today leaves that synthetic taste in my mouth. Real residents will bring with them real culture and traditions as they go about their lives, and with galleries and art centres surrounding them, it will be exciting to see what the effects of being engulfed by high culture will have on the new residents. M al Muhairi, Al Ain

In reference to the article Father's grief over murdered boy (March 8), I try to believe that this is a rare incident that happens in every society and not to be hyped as a portentous sign of any deep-rooted evil, although it resembles a horror movie.

This is an example of how a contemporary lifestyle based on consumerism undermines the moral fabric of society to the extent of taking the life of a fellow human being over a silly reason. I wish that this incident would be the first and the last of its kind and serve as a wake up call for those responsible to step in, without losing time, to cure the diease which would destroy our younger generation if left unchecked. Abdul Latheef Koladikkal, Abu Dhabi

Two groups of teenagers don't make two gangs, do they? The word "gang" infers organised groups who are associated with intimidation, violence and drugs. I think the headline here is misleading and distorts the story into one of regular and persistent "clashes", whereas the information in the story points only to a single act of unthinkable violence. MC, Abu Dhabi

Yet another senseless death, a youth and his future destroyed due to a group hellbent on misguided, hot-blooded anger. Perhaps this sad unnecessary death will bring to light that there should be more focus on youngsters and their reasons for ganging up and wanting to be part of a group which wields violence as a solution. Every adult knows and has gone through rebellious times when growing up, especially during teen years. The need to belong, to feel important and gain the respect of their peers is the only thing on some pubescent minds. Young minds are dangerously open to the satisfaction of taking away another human's life as a form of revenge. This young boy's tragic demise should bring to light the importance of focusing on the mindsets of youth here, to turn their restless minds to a more civilised way of growing up, to concentrate their energy on positive lifestyles and to respect human life, not destroy it. SS Uma, Abu Dhabi

I refer to Worker 'used phone to film woman in secret' (March 8). SM, the accused, deserves the strictest of punishments for violating a woman's privacy. The only gift one can think for International Women's Day is to ensure such a breach of conduct doesn't happen again in the UAE and that women get their due recognition and respect. John Gomes, Dubai