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Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 15 December 2018

Federal rules to tackle UAE's fake car parts trade come into effect in 2019

The move will ensure no parts can enter the market without a government-issued mark of quality

Staff from Al-Futtaim Motors and police officers raid a warehouse where fake car parts are stored. Courtesy: Al-Futtaim Motors
Staff from Al-Futtaim Motors and police officers raid a warehouse where fake car parts are stored. Courtesy: Al-Futtaim Motors

New rules to tackle the trade in low quality or fake car parts will be brought in early next year.

Vehicle spares will not be allowed to enter the market without a quality assurance mark.

Emirates Authority for Standardisation and metrology (Esma) said on Monday that it had extended the deadline for vehicle manufacturers, suppliers and dealers of vehicle spare parts to prepare for the change to early 2019. instead of October 2018.

The move is intended to tackle the use of low quality and fake parts that could lead to deadly accidents. Interpol earlier this year said it has even found brake pads made of compressed grass that easily disintegrate.

Fake alternators - used to charge a car battery - are also common and sell for as little as Dh300, about a tenth of the actual cost.

Abdullah Al Maeeni, director general of ESMA, set out details of the plan at a training workshop aimed at the inspection and control bodies in the UAE.

He said: "The development of this system aims to regulate the transport sector and vehicles in a comprehensive and integrated way, to support the safety of passengers and vehicles on the UAE’s roads, to reduce road accidents resulting from the use of passengers for defective or poor parts.

"The system focuses on providing the highest efficiency for basic parts, Such as brakes and the transmission arm, as well as spare parts for the electrical system and lighting units, as well as ventilation units and other fans."

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Read more:

Brake pads 'made of grass' among the counterfeit car parts putting UAE drivers at risk

Interpol winning the war on counterfeit goods