Abu Dhabi, UAEThursday 20 February 2020

E-scooter rider bloodied after collision with taxi in Dubai

Eyewitnesses said the woman was not wearing a helmet when she was struck outside Al Serkal Avenue

The e-scooter rider and taxi collided at this junction in Al Quoz on Thursday evening. Anam Rizvi / The National
The e-scooter rider and taxi collided at this junction in Al Quoz on Thursday evening. Anam Rizvi / The National

An e-scooter rider was injured in a collision with a taxi on Thursday night.

The woman was knocked down at a junction near Al Serkal Avenue in Al Quoz about 7pm.

An eyewitness who went to help said she was bloodied but conscious.

"When I reached the site of the accident, I saw the lady lying on the road, the taxi's screen was cracked," Roby Shamaney, from Singapore, told The National.

"There was blood on her head and she had suffered scratches."

She was conscious but went into shock, he said. An ambulance arrived a short time later.

"From what I could see, the lady had not used the proper pedestrian crossing and was hit by the taxi.

"She was not wearing a helmet and had not indicated."

Another pedestrian helped to administer first aid as a small crowd gathered to help. Dubai Police and the Roads and Transport Agency, which runs the city's publicly-owned taxi fleet, were contacted for comment.

E-scooters have rapidly grown in popularity in the past year.

In Dubai, rental operations are banned but private ownership has taken off. The vehicles are commonly seen in the Marina and Downtown, among other areas. Riders are often seen without helmets.

In Abu Dhabi, a 12-month pilot has allowed the leasing of electric scooters on some streets including the Corniche and Khalifa Street. Companies including Lime and Circ have rolled out hundreds to lease.

But e-scooters continue to exist in a legal grey area and there are no firm rules on their use.

As such they are seen being ridden on roads and pavements and helmets are not specifically mandated.

In contrast, there are clear rules on the riding of bicycles. In Dubai, riders are not allowed on roads with speed limits over 60kph since 2015 and have been legally required to wear a helmet since 2010.

Marina residents scoot around the pedestrianised district on the electric rides. Riders are often seen without helmets. Victor Besa / The National
Marina residents scoot around the pedestrianised district on the electric rides. Riders are often seen without helmets. Victor Besa / The National

Updated: February 14, 2020 04:48 PM

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