Abu Dhabi, UAETuesday 18 June 2019

Traffic chaos with two-hour delays in Sharjah as schools reopen

A police spokesman said 60 patrols had been deployed to help the flow of traffic, with 38 patrols on roads in the eastern regions of Khor Fakkan, Kalba, and Dibba Husn.

SHARJAH // Traffic slowed to a crawl on most of the emirate's roads as the school run added to rush hour congestion.

Long queues formed around the industrial areas where most schools are located, with some commuters at a standstill for more than two hours.

"We stayed in queues from around 6.30am to 8.30am. My children were stressed they had to arrive late on their first day of school," said one parent, Ahmed Muadh.

A police spokesman said 60 patrols had been deployed to help the flow of traffic, with 38 patrols on roads in the eastern regions of Khor Fakkan, Kalba, and Dibba Husn.

Police were also distributing brochures to students advising them on road safety and how to get on and off school buses properly.

Officers were working to build trust with students and in the coming weeks would also be visiting schools to give lectures, a police spokesman said.

The heavy traffic did not affect student numbers, with schools reporting attendances of between 75 and 90 per cent, said Saeed Al Kaabi, director of the Sharjah Education Zone.

"The attendance of students from the first day is very important and we always ask parents to ensure that their children report to school on time," Mr Al Kaabi said.

But some pupils were able to enjoy an extra week of holidays to allow building work on their school to be finished.

"Al Qarayen Modern School has had its beginning of term extended until next week to allow work on the new building to be completed," Mr Al Kaabi said.

In Ajman, more than 16,000 students reported to the emirate's 41 public schools for the first day of classes, said Ali Hassan, director of Ajman Education Zone.

Mr Hassan said most of the preparations for the new term had been completed and all schools had enough teachers, administrators and books.

Mohammed Abdul Karim, headmaster at Ibn Haytham Primary School in Ajman, said more than 90 per cent of their pupils arrived for classes, and the school administration was planning to use the first week of the term to ease students into the school's culture and curriculum.

ykakande@thenational.ae

Updated: September 9, 2013 04:00 AM

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