Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 15 November 2019

Sharjah Police release video highlighting dangers of leaving children locked in cars

The force is reminding parents that a child's life is their responsibility

Sharjah Police have issued a safety warning over the dangers of leaving children unattended in cars, especially as temperatures soar during the summer months. Sammy Dallal / The National
Sharjah Police have issued a safety warning over the dangers of leaving children unattended in cars, especially as temperatures soar during the summer months. Sammy Dallal / The National

Police in Sharjah have released a thought-provoking new video highlighting the stark consequences of leaving children locked in vehicles during the fierce summer heat.

The 60-second recording — posted to the force's Twitter account - shows a panic-stricken young child desperately banging on the windows of his family's car after being accidentally left behind by his parents.

The dramatic awareness video ends with a message from police that a child's life is the "responsibility" of the parent.

The safety warning comes just weeks after a six year old tragically died after being left exposed to intense heat when he was left on a school bus in Dubai while sleeping.

The death of Mohamed Farhan Faisal, who was part of a private group of children visiting Al Manar Islamic Centre in Al Quoz when the incident occurred in June, has led to increased safety measures on transport vehicles used by Islamic centres.

At the weekend, a boy, 2, was admitted to hospital in Sharjah after nearly dying from being left in his father’s hot car.

Vidur Dhawan, an associate with Abu Dhabi law firm STA, said parents needed to be aware that courts could impose significant sentences in cases involving serious child negligence.

“The court can issue a fine of up to Dh1 million if they want to set an example,” he said.

“It is not unusual for a court to want to make a statement of intent, especially when it comes to matters as serious as child safety.”

The UAE Child Rights Law was introduced in 2016 to better protect young people from negligence and physical or psychological abuse.

Updated: July 1, 2019 04:58 PM

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