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Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 23 June 2018

First Knowledge Week to be held in Dubai

The event coincides with the two-day summit covering robots to human organ 3-D printing

Investor residency programmes may assist countries such as Saudi Arabia and the UAE in building up their knowledge economies. Faisal Al Nasser / Reuters
Investor residency programmes may assist countries such as Saudi Arabia and the UAE in building up their knowledge economies. Faisal Al Nasser / Reuters

Dubai will hold a week-long knowledge event for the first time to share experiences and insight into how to tackle digitalisation and face upcomming challenges.

Knowledge Week, organised by the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Foundation (MBRF), will run from November 19 to 23 coinciding with the two-day summit on Tuesday and Wednesday at the Dubai World Trade Centre.

“With the introduction of Knowledge Week, the foundation hopes to expand the scope of the Knowledge Summit, and allow school pupils and university students to benefit from the event,” said Jamal bin Huwaireb, MBRF’s chief executive. He said the aim was to “spark a constructive dialogue among all knowledge stakeholders and influencers, bolstering ideas, projects and creative initiatives within the sector.”

From robots to human organ 3-D printing, activities throughout the week will also include the Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Award which recognises innovators making great strides in the sector.

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The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) will also release its Global Knowledge Index 2017 which looks at the international community’s knowledge level to identify opportunities and challenges in the Middle East and compare it to those of other countries around the world.

Jacob Pérez, Regional Program Coordinator at UNDP Arab Bureau, said the final index included 131 countries and was based on 133 distinct variables. He said the results weren’t about who leads, but rather where the world stands in confronting the changing landscape of development challenges.

“Those who lead definitely have experiences that we should learn from, and those who are less privileged have for sure some reasons that prevent their equitable advancement, which we also should learn from,” he said. “Development is about us all, supporting each other and learning from the experiences of each other.”