x Abu Dhabi, UAESunday 23 July 2017

Prepare for alternative energy sources now

In reference to Hanan Alawadi's opinion article We're running into oil rather than running out (February 9), the phrase "peak oil" does not refer to oil running out, merely the point at which production has peaked and enters a terminal decline.

A reader argues that a peak in global oil production will eventually be reached, so it is best to investigate new sources of energy now.
A reader argues that a peak in global oil production will eventually be reached, so it is best to investigate new sources of energy now.

In reference to Hanan Alawadi's opinion article We're running into oil rather than running out (February 9), the phrase "peak oil" does not refer to oil running out, merely the point at which production has peaked and enters a terminal decline. This refers to single wells, fields, countries and eventually the industry as a whole. By adding more and more wells to a field, production increases, but due to geological reasons, the ability of the field to produce starts to decline.

From the point of the peak, it is still possible to extract oil from the field, however it becomes ever more costly to extract it to the point where it is no longer feasible to maintain the field. To give one example, Kuwait's oil production peaked in 2005, however they can still produce for another 30 to 40 years, albeit at a reduced output. We should start investigating new energy sources now rather than sit and wait it out for another 30 years. The sooner we start, the easier the transition will be. Even implementing new energy solutions will need a healthy supply of fossil fuel to get the process going. Neil Bezuidenhout, Dubai

HA Hellyer's opinion piece It's hard not to feel like a criminal in the airport (February 10) was an interesting article. However, I don't think this applies only to Arabs or dark-skinned people. The same applies to anyone in the airport in any country. I have been in Dubai for two years and have travelled to my home country up to five times each year. I am from a country in Europe, with no history of violence or terrorism. Yet, for some reason, I have always, without fail, been subjected to "random routine" checks.

If they were simple routine scans of my suitcases, that would be fine, but there have been humiliating strip searches in a little room at Dubai airport. I always ask why me, and the answer is always "random". How could it be random? Random is once, twice ... but eight times? That's so far from random. JP, Dubai

The front page news article Nation in danger of 'losing a generation' (February 10) described failures in education. Where there is no incentive, very few are motivated. The lavish benefits and welfare system should be curtailed. Stop making the public sector a place where you can get job security and high pay. In most countries it's often only the former until you reach high levels, and progress is slow. This includes ditching the plan to subsidise private sector work. Finally, withdraw all "education" subjects that aren't actually education. It needn't be hard sciences, but actual subjects that might teach people the skills they need for a modern dynamic world. Andy P, Abu Dhabi

In reference to Road tragedy nanny out of coma and flown home (February 7), it is so sad to read such news. So many wasted lives, so much pain. I wish I could say that things seem to be improving on the roads, but it is just crazy out there. Last weekend we took our little daughters to the zoo in Al Ain and we saw three accidents. Our own car came close to being hit twice by people impatient to get on the road. It seems that everybody has the need to be first, to be at the very front of all the cars on the road. Why does everybody become so selfish when they are behind the wheel of a car? Iris G, Dubai

I refer to the article Maybe you can't buy love, but at least you can rent the dress (February 11). This might seem like poor man's talk, but isn't it atrocious to spend Dh10,000 to rent a dress for a night? This shows the extent of the commercialised, selfish lives that we lead. Ask yourself: do you really need this? With Dh10,000 one can feed a 100 hungry kids for many days. When will we realise the fruitlessness of such ostentation? With no malice and offence towards the very creative designers, the concept of spending so much on renting a dress is a sign of vulgar opulence. Ravikiran MA, Abu Dhabi

In reference to the article Interpol threat to rape-claim couple (February 11), why would they come back to face an alien court enforcing the type of prohibition laws that were seen as obsolete 80 years ago in the West? The idea that the UK would hand them over to face a charge that would not be rendered in the UK is just inconceivable. Mervyn Cowdrey, UK