x Abu Dhabi, UAEWednesday 26 July 2017

Mansour: Youth must be properly prepared for Emiratisation to succeed

Education needs further development, says Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed, Minister of Presidential Affairs and Deputy Prime Minister.

Vincenzo Acquaro, Chief for e-Government, United Nations Department for Economic & Social Affairs, speaks at the summit. Sarah Dea / The National
Vincenzo Acquaro, Chief for e-Government, United Nations Department for Economic & Social Affairs, speaks at the summit. Sarah Dea / The National

DUBAI // For Emiratisation of the private sector to succeed, the youth must be properly prepared, Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed, Minister of Presidential Affairs and Deputy Prime Minister, said yesterday.

Speaking at the Government Summit about the challenge befalling education, Sheikh Mansour said: "We have to have a responsible and able Emirati who can prove himself and can be more productive to produce the best quality work to represent the UAE in a positive way nationally and internationally."

The quality of the education system needs further development to achieve that, he said. "The parents should be participants with the school. Each school should have an administrator who is a parent to represent the students, discussing their needs and points of view."

Sheikh Mansour also said the history curriculum should focus on the events in the country before 1970. "Our ancestors were in the country hundreds of years ago, and we should allow their history to grow in our students," he said. "Our children should know about the regional environment, time, and the place that our families lived through.

"We should be proud of our history. Knowing the history of our country allows us to be more patriotic."

A collaboration between the Ministry of Education and research centres to unearth old documents and information would allow for a more comprehensive history curriculum, he said.

The Deputy Prime Minister also called for the continuous revision of Arabic and Islamic Studies material, saying they needed to be kept up to date.

"Other countries have better curriculums sadly, and we, being an Arabic-speaking nation, should have a better way of teaching the language," he said. "We need to discuss the changes, and will not force such curriculums, but we must continue to develop and update."

He also said subjects like mathematics, physics and chemistry should be translated to Arabic and summarised. "This research will never end...Today the UAE has the advantage of making fast, educated decisions based on discussions and workshops."

The most important thing is to focus on the citizen, he said. "There is no other choice."

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