x Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 29 July 2017

I want a goody bag

Even those Oscar nominees who were disappointed went home with a bag full of goodies said to be worth US$85,000.

Last night a number of lucky winners carted off little gold Oscar statuettes and were given the chance to cry in public and thank everyone from their mother to their masseuse. Even those nominees who were disappointed went home with a bag full of goodies said to be worth US$85,000, including a Fancy Feasts "Celebrate the Moment" gift package including a FlipCam Mino, a Tiffany crystal-studded cat collar and an assortment of Fancy Feast Appetisers for Cats, a holiday on the Turks & Caicos islands and an African safari with a private chef. A couple of years ago Sir Ian McKellan enthused about his loot: "I got two watches - one with 170 diamonds. A huge video instrument game, which I gave to the driver. Lots of goodies to eat and pamper yourself with. And earrings! Amazing!"

But such conspicuous consumption may not sit well with the message from one of Oscar night's most successful films. Avatar, the largest billing film in history, tells the story of the Na'vi tribe, who turn their back on consumerism and everything that Hollywood holds so dear, preferring instead to take their strength from mother nature and their profound connection with her. And very happy they are too. As Jake Sully, the hero of the film says: "There's nothing that we have that they want."

Not even a watch with 170 diamonds?