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Abu Dhabi, UAESunday 16 December 2018

High-protein diet can help heart failure patients, study finds

The study investigated a link between protein intake and survival in 2,281 patients with heart failure

A European study has found protein rich diets can help heart failure patients live longer. The National
A European study has found protein rich diets can help heart failure patients live longer. The National

Patients with heart failure who consume a diet rich in protein may have a better chance of living longer, according to new research.

A study presented at the World Congress on Heart Failure, a European Society of Cardiology event in Vienna, said a protein rich-diet could help the one in 10 people who have suffered heart failure.

The study investigated a link between protein intake and survival in 2,281 patients with heart failure, conducted in 11 European countries.

Researchers said more trials should be done to determine a recommended daily protein intake for patients with heart failure.

“We observed that in patients with heart failure, a higher protein intake is independently associated with better survival,” said Koen Streng, study author and PhD student at the University Medical Centre Groningen, the Netherlands.

“The study did not look at causes for this link, but it is likely that dietary protein builds muscle mass, which is beneficial for health in these patients.”

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Heart failure is a serious medical condition where the heart does not pump blood around the body as well as it should.

This means that the blood does not deliver sufficient oxygen and nutrients to the body to allow it to work normally.

The average age of patients in the study was 68, and 27 per cent were female.

Daily protein intake was estimated from urine samples in four sub-groups, according to the amount of protein they had consumed.

The association with mortality was then assessed.

After a 21-month follow-up period, 31 per cent of patients who consumed just 40 grams or less of protein a day had died, compared to 18 per cent of patients in the highest intake group of at least 70 grams a day.