x Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 22 September 2017

New vaccines lead to optimism for global health

Bill and Melinda Gates will produce the Goalkeepers report every year through 2030, timed for the annual gathering of world leaders in New York for the United Nations General Assembly

Bill and Melinda Gates will produce the Goalkeepers report every year through 2030, timed for the annual gathering of world leaders in New York for the United Nations General Assembly. In 2015, world leaders committed to the Global Goals, which are focused on ending extreme poverty and fighting inequalities. The report focuses on a subset of the indicators in the Global Goals and is designed to highlight best practices and help hold the foundation, its partners and leaders around the world accountable. It will document not just what is working, but where the world is falling short.

Read more: Funding and innovation key to the future of global health, says Bill Gates “This report comes at a time when there is more doubt than usual about the world’s commitment to development,” the foundation said in the report. “Take it from the point of view of justice, or take it from the point of view of creating a secure and stable world: development deserves our attention.” A figure that is often talked about is the one related to childhood death, along with poverty. “In 1990, there were 6 million more children dying than where we are today,” Mr Gates said. “This is due to the healthcare system, economic progress, vaccine coverage, new vaccines and global funding. But we shouldn’t be satisfied with where we are today. We still have over 5 million children dying every year and we see a child is 75 times more likely to die if he is born in Angola rather than in Finland.” He said there was a shift towards a lot of births seen in poor countries which called for a need to do even more to ensure such countries had access to these tools and healthcare. “We have to get new vaccines created like in India where very new things are being done and there’s a lot of good science,” he added. “My optimism about the future is because I get to live with this data and it would be valuable if we could share that outlook and be better understood.”