Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 24 August 2019

Dubai gas explosion victims treated with mother's donated placenta

A new mum donated the organ to help the two men’s skin graft treatment

Khayal Mohammed, 20, is recovering thanks to a new technique using placenta tissue to aid healing and reduce scarring. He is pictured with Dr Marwan Al Zarouni at Rashid Hospital. DHA
Khayal Mohammed, 20, is recovering thanks to a new technique using placenta tissue to aid healing and reduce scarring. He is pictured with Dr Marwan Al Zarouni at Rashid Hospital. DHA

Two men who suffered terrible burns in a gas explosion are being treated with placenta tissue donated by a new mother.

Hafizulla, 27, and Khayal Mohammed, 20, are undergoing treatment at Rashid Hospital in Dubai after the accident last month.

They suffered burns to 45 per cent and 30 per cent of their bodies respectively in an accident involving a gas canister.

“I’d lost consciousness by the time I was admitted,” Hafizulla said.

“It was just terrible; we were in so much pain. When I woke up, I realised I was in the hospital.

“I prayed to Allah, to his will. I cannot thank the doctors at the hospital enough.

It was just terrible; we were in so much pain. I'd lost consciousness by the time I was admitted

Hafizulla

“They took great care of us; we have received a new lease of life.”

Doctors used the placenta tissue to accelerate wound recovery and regenerate skin tissue in the men, who were in a critical condition.

It is the first procedure of its kind to be performed on burns victims in the UAE.

“Both the patients were the right candidates for this procedure as they are young and the wounds were clean,” said Dr Marwan Al Zarouni, head of the Burns and Plastic Surgery Unit.

“We contacted Latifa Hospital for Women and Children for a donor for the amniotic membrane.”

Doctors from the burns unit were present immediately after the birth of the baby, when the discarded placenta was used to obtain the amniotic membrane.

Medics disinfected the membrane, which is a thin film requiring a precise collection technique.

The membrane was cut into strips, disinfected and stored in sterile containers and kept in a medical refrigerator.

Prior to the amniotic membrane graft, doctors from the burns unit carried out a second round of cleaning and removal of dead skin.

Hafizulla was offered the graft procedure to his legs as they were worst affected, while Khayal had the treatment on his chest and arms.

Amniotic membrane graft is gaining popularity in burn and wound care due to the many benefits associated with it.

Only women who undergo delivery by Caesarean section can donate the amniotic membrane, as it is a sterile environment.

The amniotic membrane surrounds the placenta and nourishes and protects the developing foetus.

At birth, the placenta separates from the wall of the uterus and is expelled from the body.

The membrane is rich in nutrients, reduces inflammation, has antibacterial properties and does not trigger an immune system response. It also helps to reduce scarring.

Both men, who were admitted to hospital in June are recovering after being discharged last week.

“Placental tissues are increasingly being used in wound care and management use to its promising results,” said Dr Muna Tahlak, chief executive of Latifa Hospital for Women and Children.

“We are keen to further develop the use of amniotic membrane in burn and wound care.”

Updated: July 15, 2019 08:05 AM

SHARE

SHARE