Abu Dhabi, UAESunday 20 October 2019

Abu Dhabi health authorities: TB screenings for Brighton College pupils and staff are routine

Department of Health Abu Dhabi say screenings are carried out on a regular basis and 'should not be considered an issue of concern'

Brighton College Abu Dhabi is one of the emirate's top schools. Ravindranath K / The National
Brighton College Abu Dhabi is one of the emirate's top schools. Ravindranath K / The National

Abu Dhabi health authorities are carrying out a series of routine preventive procedures on pupils and staff exposed to a suspected case of tuberculosis.

On Wednesday, Brighton College Abu Dhabi alerted parents of a suspected case of TB, an infectious lung disease, that had been identified and said a member of the school community was receiving medical treatment.

The school's operator, Bloom Education, has since told The National that a standard tuberculous test was conducted on a member of staff from the school. It said the initial result was inconclusive, but has since been proved negative.

In a letter to parents, the private school's headmaster, Simon Corns, urged parents to take their children to the city's Disease Prevention and Screening Centre at Sheikh Khalifa Medical City as a precaution.

He said the Department of Health Abu Dhabi was liaising with the clinic and that there was "no risk to the community at present".

On Thursday, the Department of Health said it was screening pupils and staff as a precaution and to "ensure the health of all members of Abu Dhabi’s community".

In a statement, the department said screenings were typically carried out on a regular basis and "should not be considered an issue of concern."

It added that the necessary measures were being taken in line with their belief that "prevention is better than a cure".

"This screening process is designed to detect early signs of Tuberculosis and prevent its spread," the statement read.

Tuberculosis is a potentially serious infectious disease that affects the lungs and is spread from one person to another, mainly through coughs and sneezes. While many people carry the infection harmlessly, the disease can be fatal if untreated.

Screening typically includes a general assessment of a patient's condition, a skin or blood test and any subsequent tests that may be decided upon the physician’s evaluation.

Updated: June 27, 2019 01:59 PM

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