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Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 27 April 2018

Nine cloud-seeding missions since Friday as rain falls over UAE

Flights covered all parts of the country and coincide with a bout of unsettled weather 

Missions are flown across the UAE throughout the year, including summer. Courtesy National Centre for Meteorology and Seismology
Missions are flown across the UAE throughout the year, including summer. Courtesy National Centre for Meteorology and Seismology

Nine cloud-seeding missions have been undertaken over the UAE’s skies since Friday as the bout of seasonal unsettled weather continues.

The missions were undertaken across all parts of the country from Friday morning to 10am on Monday, the National Centre of Meteorology told The National.

Rain had been falling for the past few days with 16.6mm falling at one weather station in Al Ain alone on Friday and Saturday. It was the maximum recorded over the country during this time and fell at Damtha.

The rainfall has continued since then and videos posted to the NCM’s social media channels on Monday showed rainfall in many parts of the country including Dubai and Sharjah.

It coincides with a period of unsettled weather as the country goes though seasonal change.

“We are expect some rain [today] and the sea is going to be moderate to rough especially with the cloud activity over the Arabian Gulf,” a forecaster said on Monday.

The rain is expected to persist until midweek when the weather is expected to change. Humidity is set to increase then, along with a risk of mist and fog formation.

Contrary to popular opinion, the NCM’s cloud seeding missions run throughout the year. During the summer, rain can fall especially in eastern areas because of the monsoon rain clouds that drift from India.

Last year the NCM conducted 242 missions, while 177 were undertaken in 2016. Those suitable for seeding are convective clouds known as cumilform that have an updraft in the middle. When these can be seen on radar, pilots are sent to the location and fire salt flares into the updraft. These particles attract tiny droplets of water and also encourage condensation. The droplets then collide with others, become larger and eventually fall to the ground as rain.

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Read more:

The rain men: everything you need to know about UAE's cloud seeding missions

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