Abu Dhabi, UAEMonday 1 June 2020

Ajman school offers free education to hundreds of Syrian children

Manar Al Iman Charity Private School has offered 800 children the opportunity to receive free education.
Pupils spend their break time in the gym at Manar Al Iman Charity Private School. The school is providing free education for 800 Syrian children. Victor Besa for The National
Pupils spend their break time in the gym at Manar Al Iman Charity Private School. The school is providing free education for 800 Syrian children. Victor Besa for The National

AJMAN // A private school has offered 800 Syrian children free education after their families fled the war-torn country.

The Syrian children enrolled at Manar Al Iman Charity Private School this month and are aged between six and 16.

They have had difficulties accessing education and many older than 8 are illiterate.

“The children of Syria have experienced more unimaginable hardship, devastation and violence than any child should have to in 1,000 lifetimes,” said Saeed Salahd, director of social services at the Ajman school.

“Social workers at the school examined the educational and mental levels for each child. They found many of these children are older than 8 and do not know how to write or read.

“Social workers also found out many of these children experience mental disorders.”

Ali Obaid joined the school after his family arrived two months ago. “I used to live in Deir Ezzor,” said Ali, 11. “I don’t miss it there.

“I have always heard the voice of bombs and guns. I was scared and I am so happy that I live here now. I live with my mother.”

He said he could not write or read but is learning from his new Arabic teacher.

Ali’s twin, Salah, said: “I have so many friends here. I play football with my friends and puzzle games. I am happy that I am studying here. I have never studied in Syria.

“I really enjoy science class and I want to study hard to become an engineer.”

Abdul Majeed Faisal, 8, said he liked his teachers and toys. He wants to become a doctor.

“My family came to the UAE a couple of years ago,” Abdul Majeed said. “I can’t really remember when I and my family left Syria. I have so many friends here and yesterday our teachers gave us books and drawing sketches.

“My father told me that I will soon move to Sweden. I want to go to Sweden because my mother lives there.”

Rami Al Khelu, 10, also joined the school.

“My mother and father wanted to leave Syria because it was not safe,” Rami said. “In Syria, many people are being killed. My family and I were really scared.”

Abdul Aziz, an Egyptian social worker, said the children who fled the war had witnessed “the indescribable”.

The school has offered extra English classes to the children, none of whom can read or write in the language.

nalramahi@thenational.ae

Updated: April 16, 2017 04:00 AM

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