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Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 14 December 2018

Bored at work? Survey says you're not alone

Recruitment research finds almost half of managers agree work is dull, as employees say they're bored five hours a week

While one agent wants to charge Dh750 to find the jobseeker a new position, another has demanded a Dh200 upfront fee and Dh300 for each job interview. Photo: The National 
While one agent wants to charge Dh750 to find the jobseeker a new position, another has demanded a Dh200 upfront fee and Dh300 for each job interview. Photo: The National 

Dull and monotonous daily tasks are contributing to five hours of boredom a week in the workplace, according to a UAE recruitment survey.

Management failures to inspire their workforce with interesting, varied and new challenges has resulted in workers spending 13 per cent of their time bored.

Recruitment specialists Robert Half UAE found almost half of managers (47 per cent) believed their work to be not interesting enough, and 36 per cent of staff didn’t feel challenged.

“To ensure employees perform to the best of their ability and remain interested in their jobs, employers need to introduce greater variety by giving workers the opportunity to develop new skills or take on additional responsibilities," said Gareth El Mettouri, associate director at Robert Half UAE.

“It’s important to remember employees who are more interested in their jobs are likely to make a greater contribution to the organisation and contribute to its long-term success.”

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More than a third (34 per cent) of workers surveyed said there were too many unnecessary meetings, while a quarter of staff said they didn’t enjoy interacting with colleagues.

Almost one in seven said they felt restricted by overbearing policies and procedures, and 7 per cent said they didn’t understand their role in contributing to profitability.

Other employee complaints were down to bad or inefficient management (16 per cent) and a lack of diversity in their role (30 per cent), while a quarter of staff said there wasn’t enough work for them to do.

Mr El Mettouri said unfulfilled professionals should take the opportunity to address their issues with their manager.

“Without raising your hand, you might be limiting your career progression,” he said.

“As one spends approximately a third of their life at work, they should aim to find a purposeful role where they can add value and find fulfillment.”