x Abu Dhabi, UAEFriday 19 January 2018

Too much brainless 'reality'

China's comtrols on broadcast entertainment may not be a mistake, considering how TV has degenerated, a reader says. Other letters topics: holidays, re-tendering, Tevez, and more.

China's decision to ban reality shows, similar to the British show the X Factor, above, poses the question whether sensationalist entertainment deserves to be protected. Peter Wafzig / Getty Images
China's decision to ban reality shows, similar to the British show the X Factor, above, poses the question whether sensationalist entertainment deserves to be protected. Peter Wafzig / Getty Images

Once again, yesterday morning's early cup of tea and reading of The National was enlivened by the cartoon from Shadi Ghanim, depicting the maze of options that European leaders must navigate to solve Europe's debt crisis (October 27). Every day my wife and I greatly enjoy his insightful, quirky and highly amusing commentaries on the world and its often unfathomable issues.

Given Mr Ghanim's gift, might we suggest that at the end of the year The National publish a booklet for subscribers with all his 2011 cartoons, as is commonly done by newspapers in other countries? Such creativity should not be lost together with the daily rubbish.

Richard McLauchlan, Dubai

Festival of lights a 'human' holiday

Now that the festival of Diwali is upon us, it's worth reflecting on the importance of this glorious celebration (Diwali is a feast of delights, October 25). Diwali is enjoyed by Hindus and is known as the "festival of lights". And indeed, Diwali is both religious and social.

But it can and should also be celebrated by everyone.

I've celebrated Christmas while living in the US, along with my American friends. I celebrate festivals as social occasions wherever I am. And no doubt they are important. But regardless of religion we should recognise and share in the holidays of others.

We are all humans and that common element unites us, no matter what our creed.

John Donne, Dubai

Europeans could learn from Canada

Greece and the euro zone are saved, for now, from the abyss of financial chaos. Congratulations to France and Germany.

Having studied in Canada, which weathered the financial storm fairly well, I found Canadians to be rather conservative in their ways and I believe this includes how they manage their economy - and they got the fundamentals right.

I do not believe in reinventing the wheel; as a former boss once remarked "there is always someone out there who's doing it better; so let's learn from them".

Maybe the next European finance ministers meeting should be held in Toronto.

Randall Mohammed, Dubai

Apple's Jobs poses dilemma for youth

Great article from a 16-year-old for sure (Success of dropout Steve Jobs poses dilemma for students, October 25).

I think every situation is different, and educational needs vary by person. For myself, university made total sense when I wanted to be a dentist.

But looking back, I wonder if it was a waste when I realise I should have been an entrepreneur from the beginning?

Aaron Ravonsheed, US

 

Be careful when labelling Muslims

Muslims like myself are tired of being labelled. Hardly does a day pass when words like modern Islamist, Salafist, fundamentalist and so on appear in the world's media. I request The National, as a responsible newspaper, be more careful in its labelling.

For instance, can The National clarify what it means by "Moderate Islamists" in its Moderate Islamists on way to Tunisia poll win (October 20)? Who are Islamists, by the way? And under what factor does one become an "extremist" or "fundamentalist"?

Wardah MK, Abu Dhabi

 

Tevez has ensured his own dismissal

Can someone please explain to me the difference between refusing to play and refusing to warm up to play? (Carlos Tevez's £6 million 'punishment', October 27).

As far as I can see it boils down to the same thing. The only person who has damaged Tevez's reputation is Tevez, and the sooner Manchester City is able to get rid of him, the better.

MRB, Dubai

China's control of bad TV welcomed

It is interesting that China is tightening up on trash on television

(China restricts TV shows with 'excessive entertainment', October 27).

This is exactly the opposite of the trend in many western countries, where TV offerings seem to be getting stupider and stupider as time goes by.

As an older American I remember the days of quality drama like the Armstrong Circle Theatre, and clever comedy like the Danny Kaye Show and serious nightly news.

Now it's all brainless "reality shows", herd journalism and other cheap programming. Government control of media is obviously the greater evil but in this case one is tempted to side with the Chinese government.

Leonard Kennedy, US

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