x Abu Dhabi, UAEThursday 27 July 2017

The UAE is a multicultural home for many

The opinion article by Ghada Alatrash, The UAE offers a passport to a world with fewer boundaries (October 27), compared her multicultural experiences in Canada and the UAE.

The Indian author Arundhati Roy is greeted by Kashmiri activists. A reader finds fault with the reaction of the Bharatiya Janata Party to her call for the independence of Kashmir.
The Indian author Arundhati Roy is greeted by Kashmiri activists. A reader finds fault with the reaction of the Bharatiya Janata Party to her call for the independence of Kashmir.

The opinion article by Ghada Alatrash The UAE offers a passport to a world with fewer boundaries (October 27) compared her multicultural experiences in Canada and the UAE. I am a Lebanese man who has been living in New York for more than 40 years. I admire the writer for her brilliant style of writing and her questions.

The writer is a newcomer to the UAE. I am sure that later she will discover the beauty of the deserts, the oases and the people. She will try to recapture nature on a silent night with the beautiful feelings of the old-time longing for where you came from: to the tents or to the first permanent home.

When I was in the UAE for a visit, I felt that the sun and the stars had different shapes and different colours, maybe because of my rested eyes and clear skies.

In the UAE, you may go after one thing and you will find much, much more.

YA Samad, US

 

Striking at heart of corruption

The article India opens corruption call centre (October 29) was interesting. This act was implemented by the Indian government after the recent Commonwealth Games fiasco.

On the one hand, I applaud the Indian government's action and on the other hand, people who are taking money should have a conscience. Unless and until this is injected in every individual's mind, corruption will be difficult to eradicate.

K Ragawan, India

 

Comments on a conversion

In reference to the article How Tony Blair's sister-in-law converted to Islam (October 29), God bless her for choosing the right path. I wish her all the very best in the future and hope she contributes to the Islam-West dialogue in a positive way.

Syed Akbar, Abu Dhabi

*****

Why would such story need coverage? Conversion ought to be a private matter as the relationship between God and oneself is supposed to be intimate. Islamic traditions of the past encouraged people to look beyond the superficial nature of things. Perhaps this is one of many examples where the media replaces a sense of sincerity for public consumption of entertainment.

Davud Burns, UK

 

Showing cultural sensitivity

I am a Turkish architect living and working in the Emirates for the last two years and last night I was more proud of being a Turk in Abu Dhabi during the mourning period for the ruler of Ras Al Khaimah, Sheikh Saqr bin Mohammad Al Qasimi.

As most people know, the Turkish Republic was founded by one of the greatest leaders of all times, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, on October 29, 1923. We Turks celebrate this extraordinary event with all our hearts and minds and souls every year.  

Nevertheless, our celebration coincided with the mourning period for the death of the ruler of Ras Al Khaimah this year and we Turks postponed this extraordinary event as a sign of our respect to our Emirati friends.

I felt proud of my country, my citizens and my culture.

Gaye Caglayan, Abu Dhabi

 

Right-wing double standards

The news article India to close chapter on author case (October 28) reported that the Indian government decided not to file sedition charges against the author Arundhati Roy for advocating independence for Kashmir.

In the case of Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasreen, who made blasphemous comments on Islam, the Bharatiya Janata Party and other right-wing Hindu groups came out in support of her. But they find Ms Roy's comments on Kashmir intolerable.

The Hindu groups have a double standard. They demand the arrest of Ms Roy, but they support Ms Nasreen's appeal for Indian citizenship.

Aziz Mubaraki, India

 

Raising speed limits is misguided

The article Police raise speed limits to make roads safer (October 25) is frankly amazing. Airport Road from Saada street is a very urban road. The context of the street should be taken into account, with consideration of all users, not just cars. A speed of 80kph is much too fast. Arguably, 60kph is still too fast. A five per cent increase in average speeds leads to a 10 per cent rise in injury crashes and a 20 per cent rise in fatal crashes.

Raising the speed limit will also reduce the capacity of the roads, as cars travel closer together at lower speed. There is also more likelihood of drivers running lights, injury and deaths.

This is a car-centric policy, totally opposed to the vision of the city in Plan 2030.

Ford Desmoineaux, Abu Dhabi