x Abu Dhabi, UAEThursday 27 July 2017

Three fierce clashes between Pakistan and West Indies

We look at the most memorable World Cup games between the two, and another epic that marked the culmination of a six-nation tournament played in India.

Malcolm Marshall, the West Indies fast bowler, takes the wicket of Imran Khan, the Pakistan all-rounder, in the 1983 World Cup semi-final at The Oval in London. West Indies won this particular exchange. Adrian Murrell / Allsport
Malcolm Marshall, the West Indies fast bowler, takes the wicket of Imran Khan, the Pakistan all-rounder, in the 1983 World Cup semi-final at The Oval in London. West Indies won this particular exchange. Adrian Murrell / Allsport

The West Indies and Pakistan will resume one of cricket's great rivalries when they meet in Mirpur later today.

During the two decades that the men from the Caribbean dominated world cricket, Pakistan were one of the few teams capable of extending them, both in the Test and one-day international arenas.

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Here, we look at the most memorable World Cup games between the two, and another epic that marked the culmination of a six-nation tournament played in India.

Edgbaston. World Cup, 1975

In a group that also included the mighty Australia, there was no margin for error.

For Pakistan, Majid Khan led from the front with 60, and there were attractive half-centuries from Mushtaq Mohammad and Wasim Raja, both of whom played on when well set.

The West Indian top order was undone by the skill of Sarfraz Nawaz and what the Wisden Almanack called "almost indecent haste". When Clive Lloyd was seventh out after making 53, another 116 were needed.

Sarfraz returned to end Vanburn Holder's cameo and West Indies were 203 for nine, needing 66 from 14 overs. Majid tried everything, but the runs mounted and the main men had bowled out by the time he threw the ball to Raja for the final over.

Victory was clinched with two balls remaining. Deryck Murray, its architect, never topped the 61 he scored that day. Andy Roberts never made a more important 24.

Ten days later, they were world champions.

Lahore. World Cup, 1987

The West Indies had the ideal start, with Desmond Haynes and Phil Simmons adding 91, but the innings tailed off thereafter despite a typically fluent 51 from Viv Richards.

The game-changer was Imran Khan, who dismissed him and Roger Harper off consecutive balls and then mopped up the tail to finish with four for 37.

Pakistan's pursuit of 217 went nowhere fast and at 110 for five in the 35th over, they were staring at defeat. But Saleem Yousuf, who rode his luck for a belligerent 56, and Imran added 73 at better than a run a ball and with three overs left, Pakistan needed 21.

Then Patrick Patterson and Courtney Walsh both struck, leaving Abdul Qadir and Saleem Jaffar needing to score 14 from the last over to win.

Qadir's six off the fourth ball lifted the 50,000 crowd, and two were needed off the final delivery. Walsh could have run Jaffar out for backing up too far, but he didn't. Pakistan won, and the West Indies went on to miss the semi-finals for the first time.

Kolkata. Nehru Cup, 1989

Haynes batted through the innings for his 107, but no one else crossed 40.

Having noted the West Indian firepower, Imran cleverly held himself back for the slog overs. Richards, who smashed a six and two fours, was the first of his three wickets, but a total of 273 was more than handy with Curtly Ambrose, Malcolm Marshall and Walsh to defend it.

Rameez Raja's quick 35 gave the innings impetus and there were superb fifties from Ijaz Ahmed and Saleem Malik as Pakistan closed in.

Richards gambled on his main bowlers in an effort to stop the runs, leaving him to bowl the final over.

The magnificent Imran had completed his half-century, but when Wasim Akram marked his guard, three were needed from the last two balls.

He swung the first he faced over midwicket and a 70,000-strong crowd applauded as Pakistan picked up the trophy named after India's first prime minister.

 

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