x Abu Dhabi, UAETuesday 25 July 2017

Halladay and Toronto's Catch 22 situation

My team If there is one thing that makes up for the 13-year post-season absence of the Blue Jays, it is the quiet comfort of knowing that the best player in baseball still suits up for the squad.

The Blue Jays may trade Roy Halladay for their own future.
The Blue Jays may trade Roy Halladay for their own future.

If there is one thing that makes up for the 13-year post-season absence of the Toronto Blue Jays, it is the quiet comfort of knowing that the best player in baseball still suits up for the squad. Beset by injuries and under-performing millionaires, the Jays may be floundering in the standings despite early promises. But every five days, the team's starting ace, Roy Halladay, steps on to the mound and conjures up an arsenal of pitches that seem to appear to be magical.

To say Doc - an apt nickname given his resemblance to the Wild West's notorious outlaw and his surgical-like pitching - is the best player in the game today is almost an understatement. Rival teams dutifully study their schedules in hope to avoid him, batters all but give up hope of reaching base when facing him and fans not only regularly fill the stands to watch his competitive streak, but his level of professionalism as well.

At a time that saw baseball's image maligned in the wake of dozens of steroid-infused players, Halladay's dedication to winning games based on skill and strategy is refreshing and a flashback to the game's glory days. It is ironic that the only way either the Blue Jays or Halladay would reach the post-season is through a trade to a big team. Many teams are attracted to the intensity and work ethic Halladay would bring to their line-up, instantly improving their chances to win in October.

Meanwhile, a trade would give the Blue Jays a slew of highly-talented youngsters to rebuild their own team.