x Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 22 July 2017

Gillick deserves to share the stage with players

Pat Gillick became the 32nd executive to be elected to the Hall last December, but he is only the fourth executive whose major league career was solely in an off-field capacity.

At Cooperstown, New York, where the Baseball Hall of Fame sits, only baseball's best get inducted. The players are superstars, truly the best of the best.

The same goes for those who are enshrined as non-players. Pat Gillick will be inducted, too, today because, like Bert Blyleven and Roberto Alomar, Gillick was the best at what he did.

Gillick became the 32nd executive to be elected to the Hall last December, but he is only the fourth executive whose major league career was solely in an off-field capacity.

That speaks to the work Gillick did as a scout, and later, as a general manager.

He was the original general manager of the expansion Toronto Blue Jays and guided them to their only titles in 1992 and 1993. The Jays have not reached the post-season since Gillick left.

He later took over the Baltimore Orioles and steered them to two play-off appearances. The Orioles have not had a winning season since Gillick resigned.

As the general manager of the Seattle Mariners, he presided over a period in which the Mariners won more games over four seasons than any other franchise in the game, including a record 116-win season in 2001.

Finally, he went to Philadelphia in 2006, and two years later, the Phillies were world champions.

In short, everywhere Gillick went, his teams won. He used a scout's eye to put together teams and deserves his spot in the Hall every bit as much as the players with whom he'll share the stage.