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Abu Dhabi, UAEMonday 15 October 2018

ICC warns England and Sri Lanka players about match-fixing ahead of tour

International Cricket Council's anti-corruption chief says he will brief both teams about risk of approaches from shady elements

In this file photo taken on March 27, 2012 England fans watch Day 2 of the opening Test against Sri Lanka from the top of a Dutch in Galle. AFP
In this file photo taken on March 27, 2012 England fans watch Day 2 of the opening Test against Sri Lanka from the top of a Dutch in Galle. AFP

Cricket's world governing body said on Wednesday players would be briefed about the risk of approaches from "corrupters" during England's upcoming tour of Sri Lanka amid fears of match-fixing.

The International Cricket Council's anti-corruption chief Alex Marshall said Sri Lanka was the subject of corruption inquiries but the England tour itself was not under question.

"However, I will take the opportunity to brief both the teams over the coming days to ensure they remain alert to the risks from would be corrupters," Marshall said.

England will play five one-day internationals, three Tests and a one-off T20 between October 10 and November 27.

Marshall said ICC investigators were currently in Sri Lanka, but declined to elaborate.

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"I can confirm that we have, at their request, provided a detailed briefing to the Sri Lankan president, prime minister and sports minister," Marshall said.

Sri Lankan players and umpires have been accused of match-fixing in the past.

Jayananda Warnaweera, a former curator at Galle, was suspended by the ICC for refusing to cooperate with a corruption inquiry. His three-year ban ends in January.

No big-name Sri Lankan player has ever been convicted of corruption but several stars have alleged match-fixing and spot-fixing.

Sports minister Faiszer Musthapha promised tougher laws and a special police unit to deal with match-fixing after the Al Jazeera documentary made sweeping allegations of corruption.

He said existing laws were inadequate to deal with match-fixing and other forms of cheating.

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