x Abu Dhabi, UAETuesday 25 July 2017

Schools and parents should monitor children

Readers say schools need to keep an eye on pupils for any abnormalities in their behaviour. Other topics: accident, fish market, elderly

Readers say schools need to keep an eye on pupils for any abnormalities in their behaviour and act promptly to avoid a tragedy similar to the one suffered by the family of Abhimanyu Sadasivan. Courtesy the Sadasivan family
Readers say schools need to keep an eye on pupils for any abnormalities in their behaviour and act promptly to avoid a tragedy similar to the one suffered by the family of Abhimanyu Sadasivan. Courtesy the Sadasivan family

The editorial Youth suicide is too big an issue to ignore (May 6) has rightly mentioned that there is no one-size-fits-all solution. But I think parents and teachers can play a major role in preventing children from taking that extreme step. Obviously, identifying the reasons is crucial, but it is also important that parents understand the sensitivity of teenagers. While dealing with them, adults need to remember their own teenage days. That would help them to get the right perspective.

Research shows that most adolescents who commit suicide struggle with untreated depression or other significant psychological disorders.

In 50 per cent of such cases, the signs and symptoms are present, but they often go unnoticed for years. That is perhaps because of the lack of communication between parents and children.

Bullying is another cause of child suicide. The victims of bullying attempt suicide to escape the continuing harassment. In many cases, children can be brought back from the brink if parents seek medical help at the right time.

Name withheld by request

This refers to the news report Teenager wrote suicide note on exam paper (May 11). I’d say the school did about everything wrong here. If they knew about the note on Thursday, they should have contacted the parents immediately. All schools should be on high alert after a similar case earlier this year.

Fiona Duerden, Al Ain

There is no way to know if sharing the note would have helped. Please forgive and move on, although I know that it’s easier said than done. However, it is ridiculous for the school to demand fees. What has this world come to?

Name withheld by request

Heavy vehicles often flout rules

I was sad to read the report 15 killed as labourers’ bus ploughs into lorry (May 11). This tragedy that happened in Emirates Road claimed the lives of poor Asian labourers.

So many of them die in similar accidents in the UAE. I am surprised that despite so many rules and regulations, such horrifying accidents still take place. Is it because rules are not observed or is it because they are not implemented? It might be hard to get the answer.

K Ragavan, US

There is no evidence that reducing the speed limit will decrease car accidents. It is all about awareness and common sense of the driver.

Driving tests should be harder to pass, which would help greatly. Germany has the Autobahn, where there is no speed limit. Yet car accidents are not the leading cause of death there.

Sheebo Al Dasher, Dubai

New fish market a disappointment

I excitedly awaited the opening of The Market at Mushrif Mall since moving to Abu Dhabi (The Market at Mushrif Mall: Changing the food shopping landscape, May 8).

I went for the first time last week and was shocked and angered by what I saw at the fish market. Almost every stall selling fish from the Arabian Gulf had hammour and kingfish on display. When will restaurants, fishermen and the general public wake up to the fact that these are already heavily overfished?

According to the Choose Wisely consumer guide, these are in the “red” category. If they continue to be caught in such numbers, they are at risk of extinction.

I urge the authorities to utilise this new platform at the fish market to educate consumers about sustainable fishing and help them make more Earth-friendly choices.

Jennifer Fisher, Abu Dhabi

Plight of elderly needs attention

This is with reference to Ayesha Al Khoori’s article, Give elderly bigger role in society, FNC urges (May 2). It is heartening to note a growing awareness and advocacy of senior citizens’ plight.

Increasing longevity due to improved medical facilities, coupled with the measures to control birth rates, have created another set of issues pertaining to elders.

To deal with those issues, it’s necessary for the Government and NGOs to have plans in place, as well as for pressure groups to draw attention to those matters.

The UN observes the World Elderly Abuse Awareness Day on June 15 and International Day of Older Persons on October 1 every year. It would be appropriate to mark those occasions with lectures, workshops on gerontology and geriatrics, training for caregivers and felicitation of senior citizens.

CS Pathak, India