x Abu Dhabi, UAESunday 23 July 2017

Rouhani unable to change Iran’s foreign policy

Iran's president is in no position to strike a better relationship with the United States, a reader says. Other topics: child safety, football and smoking.

A reader says the Iranian president is unable to change his nation’s foreign policy. Presidency Office, Rouzbeh Jadidoleslam/ AP
A reader says the Iranian president is unable to change his nation’s foreign policy. Presidency Office, Rouzbeh Jadidoleslam/ AP

I am writing in reference to Majid Rafizadeh’s article Don’t expect any big breakthroughs during Rouhani’s US trip (September 22).

I think the best way to evaluate Iranian President Hassan Rouhani is to compare his government with the administration of Mohammad Khatami, who was president from 1997 to 2005.

Mr Khatami was much more to the left than Mr Rouhani is. He was a reformist, but he was not able to change anything in Tehran’s foreign policy. So how is possible that a centrist might change these policies?

American and Iranian leaders might shake hands at the United Nations, but the problems between these two countries will last. Dina Al Saud, Saudi Arabia

Child safety must be highest priority

In Child crash victims had no restraints, says study (September 21), it is revealed that nearly 40 per cent of UAE residents think it is all right to ride with children on their laps.

“Seventy-five were fined for allowing children under 10 to travel in the front seat,” it says.

I’ve seen that many offenders in the past couple of weeks alone, indicating that this offence is not a priority for police and that there is a lack of enforcement. I also blame complete ignorance on the part of the parents.

Four hundred dirhams is a laughable fine for such a serious offence. I would set the penalty at Dh5,000, plus licence suspension and mandatory attendance at a lecture about car safety that shows parents what would happen to their unrestrained child in the case of an accident.

Repeat offenders should be paid a visit by child-protection officers.

People who don’t restrain their children are putting them in grave danger. It really is inexcusable.

Ziad Q, Abu Dhabi

Liverpool defeat good for game

Liverpool lose their unbeaten record (September 22) was one of the better-written sport reports in The National in recent times.

It’s refreshing to read a report that isn’t entirely constrained by chronology.

That said, it’s been just smashing to see Brendan Rodgers’ men lose for a change. The red half of Liverpool has been insufferable this season.

Name withheld by request

Technology helps set insurance rate

I am writing in reference to your editorial New insurance law will improve safety (September 20).

In some places they have “black box” technology where a webcam is fitted to your car to record your driving habits.

At the end of a specific period, the insurance company can assess what kind of driver you are and your insurance premiums can be adjusted accordingly.

This is the 21st century, so why not use the technology available to assess whether a driver is good or bad?

The system also allows the driver to view what is recorded, and it can give advice on how you can avoid accidents. U Bhaji, UK

Residents should respect the rules

I refer to My niqab, and why I wear it (September 19).

When an individual chooses to become a resident of a country, it is expected that he or she will follows the rules of that country.

No comparisons should be made between the law of UAE and the laws of other countries.

Satwa Gunam, Dubai

Smoking students need education

I regularly see a group of students from a private school in the Tourist Club area gathering behind nearby buildings to smoke cigarettes before they go to class.

Since this action is happening outside of school premises, I am sure that the school authorities are helpless and cannot be held responsible for it.

However, perhaps other authorities could monitor this and make an effort to educate these students and their parents about the dangers of smoking.

Name withheld by request