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Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 15 December 2018

No end in sight to the plight of the Syrians

Readers discuss genocide, antibiotics and more

The recent shelling by the Syrian regime on the rebel-held Eastern Ghouta, which has been besieged since 2013 and where humanitarian conditions are dire, killed at least 10 civilians, among them six children, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. AFP
The recent shelling by the Syrian regime on the rebel-held Eastern Ghouta, which has been besieged since 2013 and where humanitarian conditions are dire, killed at least 10 civilians, among them six children, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. AFP

Your editorial 31,000 more reasons why Assad must go (November 19) was thought-provoking. Even after six years, the crisis in Syria has only worsened and seems to have no end in sight. In the end, only the civilians suffer. The spate of chemical weapons attacks and the countless people killed in prisons begs the question: what is Assad after? The international community must act on this perpetual menace.

K Ragavan, India

Rohingya are always on the brink of genocide

I refer to your article Urgent action needed on Rohingya crisis (November 20). As long as there remains little political will within Myanmar to avert the bloodshed in Rakhine State, the situation of the Rohingya will continue to deteriorate despite widespread international outcry and growing calls for action.

The recent spike in violence is indicative of a renewed campaign to remove the Muslim minority group from Myanmar – at the very least by spreading fear and forcing thousands to risk their lives and flee across borders or the open seas. Until institutionalised and widespread discrimination against the Rohingya – sustained across decades – is meaningfully challenged within Myanmar itself, violence will continue to be legitimised and the Rohingya will always seemingly stand on the brink of genocide.

Samaoen Osman, South Africa

War crimes judgments often come too late

I refer to your article ‘Butcher of Bosnia’ faces judgment two decades after alleged war crimes (November 19). Only those who fall stand for trial on war crimes. I have never seen someone in power in an international criminal court.

Guglielmo Molteni, Abu Dhabi

The crackdown on overuse of antibiotics is welcome

I refer to your article New laws will get tough on pharmacists who illegally sell antibiotics in UAE (November 19). Finally, something is being done about this. The problem is with doctors who needlessly and all too easily write prescriptions for antibiotics. They need to be penalised and must not dispense such medications unless there is a test that proves there's a bacterial infection.

Sana Rifai Al Helou, Sharjah

Each family should have a family doctor who should have certain number of families under his or her care and then refers patients to specialists. It should be the physician's responsibility what drugs his patients are getting. If someone goes to a doctor over here for infection and the patient again gets the same infection, the patient may very well not be able to see the same doctor again.

We often find ourselves repeating our patient history every time we have a new ailment. Patient information should be under a centralised authority. Patients should be able to change doctors without having to have their blood tests and vitals taken at every visit.

Farhana Hassan, Abu Dhabi