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Abu Dhabi, UAEMonday 15 October 2018

Worrying stories breed a genuine fear of air travel

Our readers have their say on financial management, the beauty of language and Air India

An Indian policeman watches at Begumpet Airport in Hyderabad. Noah Seelam / AFP
An Indian policeman watches at Begumpet Airport in Hyderabad. Noah Seelam / AFP

I refer to your article Air India jet hits wall on takeoff (October 13). The Indian national carrier plane bound for Dubai from the southern Indian city of Trichy sadly hit the airport perimeter wall while carrying 136 passengers.

Luckily, no passengers were hurt. But the aircraft was forced to divert to Mumbai after four hours for safety.

The civil aviation minister ordered an investigation and highlighted the priority of safety. This follows a string

of incidents reported on Air India flights. Today, many people are scared to travel in planes because of multiple worrying stories.

K Ragavan, Bengaluru

Sound financial management is far easier said than done

I write in reference to your online article Money & Me: ‘If you only save and never spend, what type of life are you living?’ (October 13): there is no one in the UAE who is living without spending. In all aspects of our daily lives we are forced to spend.

But it is the urge to make unnecessary tempting purchases that we need to control. You save for your future, it’s as ­simple as that. However, I know that it is easier said than done. Proper financial ­planning, thinking and managing your budget goes a long way to improving your standard of living and financial wellbeing later in life.

The trick is to spend within your limits. If you earn a meagre salary, why make flashy purchases by taking loans and other services? That is a one-way ticket to debt. But that is precisely what many people

do when they move here. Colorful adverts and promotions also tempt us. Even if we manage our finances carefully and jot down the things we need and how much we would like to spend, something or the other always has a habit of coming up.

Matthew Litty, Dubai

Language offers a window into other cultures

I write in reference to Shelina Janmohamed’s opinion piece Languages are tools for communication and understanding, not fear and division (October 12): every single language is a key that opens the doors of warmth and friendship between people. They also offer a window into the culture of the people that speak them, which is interesting and highly informative.

The day I picked up a certain level of Swahili while in Africa, a new door opened for me, showing the rich culture of

the land.

Name withheld by request