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Abu Dhabi, UAEMonday 18 June 2018

We must lend our support to Mosul zoo’s wounded animals

Readers discuss Netanyahu, animal rights, cricket and road crashes

Simba the lion, one of two surviving animals in Mosul's zoo, along with Lola the bear, is seen at an enclosure in the shelter after arriving to an animal rehabilitation shelter in Jordan.  Muhammad Hamed / Reuters
Simba the lion, one of two surviving animals in Mosul's zoo, along with Lola the bear, is seen at an enclosure in the shelter after arriving to an animal rehabilitation shelter in Jordan. Muhammad Hamed / Reuters

I am writing in reference to your article With ISIL driven out, Mosul zoo reopens (March 22). I am a longtime subscriber to and reader of The National (I’ve been following this newspaper from day one) and I was struck and dumbfounded by the horrific images of the animals in Mosul zoo. In particular, the lethargic lions in cages tearing up shreds of plastic for want of toys, food, enrichment. I wish, as a loyal reader, that The National had added a critical comment about this sorry state of affairs. I have followed the reports of that zoo and have donated money in order for the animals to be taken to rescue centres. I am aghast that the drama is to continue. I hope The National will give its support to these voiceless animals.

Claudia Gehre, Germany

Benjamin Netanyahu is destroying trust

I refer to your article Israeli police question Netanyahu in telecom corruption case (March 26). Corruption and scandals are common in international politics and, it seems, the Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu is not an exception to this conventional wisdom. However, his outright rejection of the allegations, which have been investigated by the police twice, and reliance on demagoguery to avert the impending crisis are deeply harmful to institutions. What will be the outcome?

K Ragavan, Bangalore

We’d all be safer if tailgating and fast driving were curbed

I write in reference to your editorial Carrot-and-stick approach could make our roads safer (March 26). Two things immediately strike drivers when they first take to the roads in the UAE.

First, the inexplicable urge on the part of some motorists to drive their cars at full throttle, as though they were permanently attending to emergencies. Quite why they need to rush is unclear.

Secondly, the reckless tailgating at high speed and overtaking on the hard shoulder if one doesn’t get out of their way quickly.

What lies behind this grandstanding? This urge to always be in front is hard to comprehend, but in some ways explains the death toll you cite in your editorial.

Andy Preston, Abu Dhabi

Australian cricketers have got what they deserve

I refer to your article Sponsors desert Cricket Australia over ball tampering (March 29). Australian cricketers, perennial bad boys of the gentleman’s game thanks to their sledging, have finally received what they deserve.

The current scandal reminds one of the “bodyline” bowling drama that unfolded when England visited Australia for the Ashes in 1932-33.

Today’s sandpaper saga has tarnished Australia’s reputation as a top sporting nation. India and England, whose players have repeatedly been sledged by Australian cricketers in the past, evidently appear happy that Australia has got its comeuppance.

AR Modak, Johannesburg