Abu Dhabi, UAEThursday 24 October 2019

Transparency an important policy for any government to adopt

Our readers have their say about good governance, food waste and school fees

Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai, chairs a UAE Cabinet meeting in Abu Dhabi on Sunday. Courtesy Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Twitter
Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai, chairs a UAE Cabinet meeting in Abu Dhabi on Sunday. Courtesy Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Twitter

I write to you in reference to the editorial UAE leadership takes nothing for granted (September 2).

Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai, was right to write an open letter to his cabinet colleagues, in which he called on them to immerse themselves among the people to serve them better. It shows transparency on the part of government, which I believe is a key component of good governance.

It is my firm conviction that this is the hallmark of Narendra Modi’s success as India’s prime minister.

K Ragavan, Bengaluru

Some of the wasted food should be sent to animal rescue groups

I write to you in reference to Patrick Ryan’s piece UAE minister urges hospitality sector to help in fight against food waste (September 2).

It is great to see this problem being exposed and addressed. I hope some of the leftover food can find its way to animal rescue groups to help feed hungry dogs that have been discarded on the streets.

Lorraine Ludman, Dubai

There is no easy solutions to the problem of high school fees

I write to you in reference to Anam Rizvi’s piece Six out of 10 parents believe school fees in Dubai are too high (September 4).

We all want the best education for our children, but good schools may charge fees ranging from Dh80,000-Dh100,000, which is expensive. This can be a problem for expats who are forced to relocate their children.

One suggestion would be for government to step in and regulate the fees, but this would require negotiations with the education providers. Another idea would be for education to be subsidised. But the question about where the funding for it would come from arises. After all, the public pays for services but it does not income tax.

Randall Mohammed, Dubai

Updated: September 4, 2019 06:57 PM

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