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Abu Dhabi, UAESunday 21 October 2018

Kudos to Trump and the two Koreas for pursuing peace

Our readers have their say on Syria, Russia, cricket, online shopping and North Korea

South Korean President Moon Jae-in shakes hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un after watching a performance at the May Day Stadium in Pyongyang, North Korea on September 19. Reuters
South Korean President Moon Jae-in shakes hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un after watching a performance at the May Day Stadium in Pyongyang, North Korea on September 19. Reuters

I write in reference to your encouraging report North Korea willing to dismantle missile test site and allow in inspectors (September 19): it is heartening to see the leaders of South and North Korea meet and try to put a stop to the enmities of the past. They have also agreed to connect the two countries through rail and road networks. More importantly, the regular people of the two countries will now have an opportunity to meet their relatives and friends on the other side of the DMZ after decades of separation without contact. Congratulations to the two countries, and also to US President Donald Trump for his unorthodox but impressive initiatives to bring the two countries closer together after decades of animosity.

Hopefully some day India and Pakistan will also bury the historical hatchet where it belongs and awaken to a new morning of co-operation and friendship.

Rajendra Aneja, Dubai

Syria has become a tug of war for domination

After reading your article Moscow says its Syrian ally shot down Russian plane (September 19), I am forced to ask: what else does Russia expect from its ally Syria under Bashar Al Assad? Death and destruction are Mr Al Assad’s modus operandi, when he should be prioritising peace. And Russia remains an ally amid all of this. Finding peace requires a combined effort. But what hope is there when superpowers are embroiled in a tug of war for domination?

Name withheld by request

Warm wishes to both the Indian and Pakistani cricket teams

I refer to your article The UAE’s ‘home’ game: India and Pakistan cricket fans get ready for latest chapter in fierce sporting rivalry (September 19). The landmark Asian Cup match between India and Pakistan in Dubai was very good news for the residents of the UAE. ­Millions of people – Indians, Pakistanis and other nationalities – watched on television and in the stadium. More than two decades ago, India and ­Pakistan played in Sharjah Cricket Stadium and later stopped for security reasons. The return of this meeting of teams has been rightly heralded.

I watched many matches in Sharjah Stadium when I was living in the UAE and enjoyed the immense spirit of the UAE’s cricket fans, who deserve to be entertained by both national teams. ­Ultimately, feats of sporting prowess should be admired, whatever the result. Given the weighty expectations on both sides, I wished both of them good luck.

K Ragavan, Bengaluru

Sometimes mergers and acquisitions don’t help

I write in reference to your ­article In a lather: Shopper’s dismay after receiving soap ­instead of Dh2k phone in delivery mix-up (September 19): if this was Amazon, they would let you keep whatever was delivered by mistake and ship your items immediately. I hoped Souq would improve when Amazon bought it, but apparently I was wrong.

Carmen Page, Dubai