Abu Dhabi, UAESaturday 24 August 2019

Journalists have to deal with a raft of misinformation

Our readers have their say on the youth, UAE reforms and the news

Mahinaz Hamza, winner of The National's Future of News journalism competition, pictured with Mina Al-Oraibi, editor-in-chief of The National and Laura Koot, managing editor. Chris Whiteoak / The National
Mahinaz Hamza, winner of The National's Future of News journalism competition, pictured with Mina Al-Oraibi, editor-in-chief of The National and Laura Koot, managing editor. Chris Whiteoak / The National

This refers to the article The future of news is still in the hands of real-life journalists (December 30).

After reading the article by Mahinaz Hamza, I must say that The National’s Future of News competition for aspiring young journalists has given an opportunity to the youth to think and share their thoughts within the current comprehensive and competitive media enclave.

The power of the pen can certainly reach deep inside the sentiments of human beings and spark real and profound change. Although the very concept of ‘news’ is not beyond debate, real-life journalists face massive challenges in today’s world. The thoughts within each article, however simple, are those of humans, so they do have a human touch.

Compared with the past, the lives of journalists have become more challenging today. They face and witness atrocities, humiliations and much more, especially when it comes to embedded journalism. Perhaps finding the source may not be the real challenge for them, but rather overcoming the realities of more stressful situations than most of us come across in life. However, the most challenging thing for journalists is to deal with the devaluing of truth by the tranche of feelings flooding through social media forums. Congratulations to Mahinaz Hamza.

Ramachandran Nair, Muscat

It’s time to harness the power of youth in the Arab world

I write in reference to James Langton’s article 2018 in review: out of this world achievements for UAE (Decmber 27). In my view, all Arab states must invest in research and development across various essential services and particularly in science and technology as a top priority if they wish to be influential and powerful independent nations.

It is time to harness the power and ambition of youth across the Arab world, so that its constituent countries can move ahead. There is a lot of potential around. Well done to the UAE for recognising that.

Name withhled by request

Kudos to the UAE for its year of sweeping reforms

I write in reference to your article How 2018 became the UAE’s year of reform (December 30). Gillian Duncan’s superb piece elaborately outlining the many sweeping reforms made by the UAE in 2018, the Year of Zayed, was much appreciated. Strategies and reforms like these are necessary in all countries of the world and the UAE understood that early and took decisive action. My own country, India, has also seen many changes targeting long-term growth this year.

All in all, I think the UAE’s visa policy changes will certainly yield better growth in the coming years. Kudos to the UAE for making 2018 a true year of reform.

K Ragavan, Bengaluru

Updated: December 30, 2018 07:49 PM

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