Abu Dhabi, UAEThursday 21 November 2019

Protesters around the world are right to want their voices heard

Our readers have their say about clashes across the world, the cost of living, and a gesture towards the British royal couple in Pakistan

Violent protests broke out in Chile over an increase in the price of metro tickets. Firefighters extinguish burning buses during clashes between protesters and the riot police in Santiago, on October 19. AFP
Violent protests broke out in Chile over an increase in the price of metro tickets. Firefighters extinguish burning buses during clashes between protesters and the riot police in Santiago, on October 19. AFP

I write to you in reference to the article Protests around the world: violent clashes hit Chile, Hong Kong, Lebanon and Barcelona (October 19). A lot of these countries have poor administration in common and it is the people who suffer — a sorry state of affairs. It is sad to read about economic compulsions driving so many citizens across the world to the streets. In my experience, the Spanish are a friendly people and I feel for them now as they protest for their rights. The clashes are a worrying sign for any nation and the leadership will do well to take into account the will of the citizens. Any successful administration will need to prioritise and resolve the grievances of its people.

K Ragavan, Bengaluru

Sharjah's soothing vibe and architecture are an inspiration

I write to you in reference to your article 'The Sharjah way': why a visit to the northern emirate can soothe the soul (October 18). The mosques in Sharjah by night are beautiful. Especially the Al Noor Mosque.

Name withheld on request

The gesture of a Urdu-English translation goes a long way

I write to you in reference to your article Kate Middleton wears turquoise hijab to visit Badshahi Mosque in Lahore, Pakistan (Oct 17). In the embedded video, you can hear a man ending a recital. Just as he is about to begin the subsequent verse, a lady sitting beside Kate and William says, "Thank you. Thank you so much, shukria". In Pakistan, each recitation of the Holy Verses is usually followed by its Urdu translation. In this case it was arranged in advance that the lady sitting next to the royal couple would read the English translation for their understanding, which she did after the first recitation.

Mohammad Hamza, Dubai

Waiting for rain clouds todescend over my neighbourhood

I write to you in reference to your article UAE weather: Country braced for five days of rain (October 20)

Evidently, the weather in the northern Emirates is different from where I live. I'm being told that it is raining everywhere in the UAE but I haven't yet felt a single drop in Abu Dhabi.

Name withheld on request

A word of caution: when in the UAE, save more than you spend

Many of us are apprehensive about the future. It's something we discuss in office, at home and coffee shops. I ask myself, where I will be in a few year's time. While salaries rarely increase, the cost of living in the UAE has gone up. The great thing, however, is that rents have fallen. Still, people are always on the lookout for better pay packages. If you have children, you need to spend more on groceries, fuel and clothes and it becomes tougher to save. But if you are smart and earn Dh25,000 per month, you should be able to save at least Dh10,000.

Mathew Litty, Dubai

Updated: October 20, 2019 06:28 PM

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