Abu Dhabi, UAEMonday 16 December 2019

The National

Lebanon, Iraq, Bahrain National Day, Abu Dhabi tourism figures and more

Hello from The National's newsroom in Abu Dhabi.

A veteran Sudanese lawyer heading a government-appointed commission to investigate the deadly breakup of a sit-in protest in June has vowed to seek out the truth. Speaking to The National, Nabil Adib criticised the speculation he was beholden to the government or the military.

Lebanese protesters have accused riot police of using excessive in Beirut after authorities used rubber bullets, tear gas and water cannon at the weekend.

Iraqi demonstrators, meanwhile, rejected the alleged nomination of Mohammad Al Sudani to head the new government as political leaders attempt to strike a deal to end a political stalemate in Baghdad.

And, for yet another year, Gaza's tiny Christian community will be forced to mark Christmas under siege.

Gulf leaders have congratulated Bahrain as the country prepared to celebrate National Day today.

The number of tourists visiting Abu Dhabi this year has risen by 100,000, new figures have shown. Officials from the Department of Culture and Tourism also said the emirate had recorded a seven per cent increase in hotel revenues.

Here’s the rest of your morning headlines.

BUSINESS Lower government spending next year will reduce Saudi Arabia's medium-term fiscal vulnerabilities to changing oil prices and the kingdom is on course for a balanced budget by 2023, the Institute of International Finance (IIF) said.

SPORT Chirag Suri and Basil Hameed hit sparkling half-centuries as UAE claimed their first victory in cricket’s World Cup League 2. The national team beat Scotland by seven wickets in the final match of the tri-series at the ICC Academy in Dubai.

OPINION Gavin Esler on the shock waves sent out by the UK’s general election last week and Michael Young on why Lebanon’s army are not the solution to the country’s crisis.

ARTS&LIFESTYLE Talin Hazbar’s work, currently on show at Warehouse421, in the Structures of Impermanence exhibition, considers Syrian fountains. “When I think of the fountain, it feels like I’m trying to connect back to Syria, but through a structure,” Hazbar explains. “It’s something we used to see constantly before leaving Syria, which is very beautiful when you think about it now.”

And finally, Hayley Skirka offers a guide to aircraft etiquette. If you are unsure whether it’s fine to recline, click here.

All this and more in The National – look out for the print edition, visit TheNational.ae, find us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter for round-the-clock updates.

Nick March

Assistant Editor in Chief

If you're on the go, don't forget our mobile app – for iOS and Android – and also get news alerts sent directly to you or sign up for our WhatsApp service.

Updated: December 15, 2019 09:58 PM

SHARE

SHARE

Editor's Picks
Most Read
Most Read
Most Read
Most Read
Most Read
Most Read
Most Read
Most Read