x Abu Dhabi, UAESunday 23 July 2017

Morsi wasn't given much of a chance

A reader says the ousted Egyptian president was given too little time to fix the errors of the past. Other topics: pesticides, school buses, terrorism and human trafficking.

An Egyptian supporter of the Muslim Brotherhood holds a picture of deposed president Mohamed Morsi outside Cairo's Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque on July 5, 2013. Supporters of ousted Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi took to the streets in their tens of thousands, defying his army deposers and triggering running clashes that killed at least three people. AFP PHOTO/MAHMUD HAMS

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An Egyptian supporter of the Muslim Brotherhood holds a picture of deposed president Mohamed Morsi outside Cairo's Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque on July 5, 2013. Supporters of ousted Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi took to the streets in their tens of thousands, defying his army deposers and triggering running clashes that killed at least three people. AFP PHOTO/MAHMUD HAMS *** Local Caption *** 499088-01-08.jpg

Seeking a safer alternative to toxic pesticides

I am writing in reference to Four arrested in pesticide deaths case (July 4). This is a really tragic incident that could have been easily avoided.

When I had my flat fumigated, the pest-control people told me to leave the premises for at least 24 hours because of the harsh chemicals involved.

I actually stayed away for 48 hours, but when I returned home the toxins still bothered me, and I suffered headaches and a sore throat.

To be present when these poisons are being used is a recipe for disaster, as this case has proven.

I think pest-control companies in the UAE should be using different methods. Surely there's no need to use such toxic chemicals, there must be some kind of natural alternative.

May the young girl who died from poisoning rest in peace.

Chris Murray, Abu Dhabi

Morsi wasn't given much of a chance

I am writing regarding the removal from office of Mohammed Morsi (Egypt's new president: nation must now unite, July 5)

I am not sure that Egypt has this right. How could the people expect Mr Morsi to fix 30 years of Hosni Mubarak's destruction in only one year?

Anyone who became president after the Arab Spring was going to have a tough time.

Still, there is never a dull moment in Middle Eastern politics.

Taghred Chandab, Dubai

All terrorism must be acknowledged

The hypocrisy of Israel rejects group's terrorist tag (June 18) is breathtaking.

Whenever a Jewish holy site is desecrated, the news is splashed across the media with accusations of jihadist-inspired terrorism, and international organisations and western states are coerced into issuing condemnations.

When the tables are turned, however, the Israeli government applies a different standard, and it arrogantly refuses to compare orthodox-inspired violence and terrorism with jihadist terrorism.

If the Israeli government were to condemn all racist and religious attacks on innocent people as terrorism, it might help to restore that country's deteriorating international standing.

Name withheld by request

Vaccinations are a matter for parents

Couple who kept child secret for eight years appear in Dubai court (July 4) mentions that the parents did not have their child vaccinated.

Why are people being coerced to vaccinate their children?

Parents who do not believe in vaccines should be able to make that choice.

Ursula Riches, UK

America treats its friends badly

I refer to US spying on EU allies a new low (July 6).

I wonder what the Americans' intentions are towards their so-called friends in other parts of the world.

Oddly, European governments seem to cower to US demands - as they did when they ordered the grounding of the Bolivian president's flight.

Joe Burns, Sharjah

Dangerous buses should be banned

In reference to Dubai to phase out school minibuses (July 1), why can't the government simply ban the sale of these "coffins on wheels"?

If they pose a threat to school pupils and other commuters, they should not be on the roads.

Amir Nawaz, Abu Dhabi

Support for bid to tackle trafficking

Crackdown on human trafficking (July 5) is welcome news.

It is one of the best initiatives taken by UAE authorities, but I think more public engagement will be required in this regard.

It will be much better if the non-government sector took the lead role in creating awareness, with government agencies playing a supporting role.

Muhammad Naeem Ul Fateh, Pakistan